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160 (a)-ll-43. 13061 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 



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TRUSTEE 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 



TRUSTEE 






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TRUSTEE 



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16C(a)-lM3. 13061 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 



TRUSTEE 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF SUB-COMMITTEE ON DEVENS EXTENSION 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES, MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

June 26, 1946, 1:00 P.M., Parker House, Boston 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Mrs, McNamara, Whitmore, 

Desmond, Dr. Gust af son of Williams College, 
representing President Baxter, Dean Miller 
of Tufts College, representing President 
Carraichael, President Baker, Dean Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 

Dr. Boyden reported on his efforts to find a president for the 
Devens extension. Various names were proposed and discussed by the 
committee. 

Dr. Boyden then presented a series of recommendations which 
were prepared by the college administration for consideration by his 
committee. These recommendations were approved by the committee as 



Devens 



Recommendations 



follows: 



1* That the executire officer of the DeYens extension 
shall be a vice-president. 



2. 



3. 



4. 



That two deans shall be appointed by the Governing 
Board upon the recommendation of the sub-committee 
of the Board of Trustees of the College on Devens 
Extension and the President of Massachusetts State 
College. 

That admissions to the Devens Extension be handled 
at Massachusetts State College by the Registrar and 
admissions committee; that an Assistant Registrar be 
appointed upon recommendation of the Dean and Presi- 
dent of Massachusetts State College. 

That Professors and Heads of Departments be appointed 
by the Governing Board upon the recommendation of the 
vice-president in consultation with the President of 
the College 5 that teaching personnel below the rank 
of Heads of Departments be appointed by the vice- 
president upon the recommendation from Heads of De- 
partments and the Deans. 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



5« That the Librarian and assistants, Director of Health 
and assistants, Director of Recreation and Athletics 
and assistants shall be appointed by the vice-presi- 
dent or by the President of the College if the vice- 
president is not appointed in time to act. 

6, That the chief fiscal officer at the extension shall 
be appointed by the Governing Board upon the 
recommendation of the Treasurer and the President of 
Massachusetts State College; Assistant Treasurer, 
bookkeepers, etc* to be appointed by the chief 
fiscal officer after consultation with the 
Treasurer of the College and with the approval of 
the vice-president. 

7. That the general superintendent of the plant be 
appointed by the vice-president upon recommendation 
of the chief fiscal officer of the extension. 



8. That the manager of dining halls be appointed by the 
vice-president on the recommendation of the chief 
fiscal officer; this manager to organize force and 
facilities and if dining halls are operated as con- 
cessions to be supervisor. 

9. That personnel to supervise postal, express service 
and transportation be selected by the chief fiscal 
officer and be responsible to him. 

10. That clerical staff be under supervision of various 
administrative, instructional and operative depart- 
ments and be selected through the deans and appointed 
by the vice-president. 

11. That the curriculum for the first year be limited te 
basic fundamental courses with certain variations as 
may be justified by selection of majors by veterans; 
curriculum to be substantially as described in the 
catalogue of the College. These specific courses, as 
described in the catalogue of the College are; 

Curriculum English 1, Composition 

English 25, English Literature 

English 29, Speech 

Math 1, Algebra 

Math 3» Algebra and Trigonometry 

French 1, Elementary 

French 5> Intermediate 

French 7, French Survey 

German 1, Elementary 

German 25, Intermediate 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



Spanish 25, Elementary 

Spanish 51* Intermediate 

Botany 1, Introductory 

Chemistry 1, General 

History 5> Modern European Civilization 

Drawing 1, Engineering Drawing 

Economics 25 > Elements of Economics 

Agriculture, Problems and Policies 

English 2, Composition 

English 26, English Literature 

English 30, Speech 

Math 2, Trigonometry 

Math 4, Trig, and Analy. 

French 2, Elementary 

French 6, Intermediate 

French 8, French Survey 

German 2, Elementary 

German 26, Intermediate 

Spanish 26, Elementary 

Spanish 52, Intermediate 

Zoology 1, Introductory 

Chemistry 2, General 

History 6, Modern European Civilization 

Engineering 2, Descript. Geo. 

Psychology 26, General 

Agriculture, Soil Science 

Each student takes five courses, in line with his major in- 
terest: 

1. All students take English and Mathematics. 

2. Science students take, in addition, Foreign Language, 

Biology, and Chemistry. 

3. Liberal Arts students take Foreign Language, Biology 

or Chemistry, and History. 

4. Agriculture students take Biology, Chemistry, and 

Agriculture. 

5. Engineering students take Math 3 in place of Math 1, 

and Foreign Language, Chemistry, and Engineering 
Drawing. 

6. Business Administration students take Economics, 

History, and Foreign Language. 

7. Students offering advanced credits take English 25-29 

and Economics 25. 

12. That brief printed announcement of opening of the 

Devens extension, courses to be offered, and arrange- 
ments as to living conditions and expenses be pre- 
pared immediately to Assistant Registrar of the 
College in contacting veterans now listed as in- 
terested in Devens, and others who may apply, that 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



Business and 

Financial 

Management 



Equipment and 
Supplies 



Leasing of 
Grounds and 
Buildings 



no catalogue of the Devens extension similar to 
the College catalogue is considered necessary; 
that all publicity as to the Devens extension 
shall be approved at the College. 

Upon the recommendation of Treasurer Hawley and President 



Baker, it was 

VOTED; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the following organization for business and 
financial management of the Devens extension* 

1. Chief Fiscal Officer 

a. Bursar for handling receipt and disbursement 
of all funds. 

b. Chief Accountant - accounting and budget control 

c. Procurement and Property Officer - purchasing, 
inventories, custody of all property 

d. Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds - 
maintenance of buildings and grounds, 
transportation 

e. Supervisor of Housing and Boarding Operations 
f « Manager of Stores, Theatres, etc. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that it had been necessary for the 

Treasurer and other officers of the College to take steps to secure 

needed equipment and supplies for the Devens extension. This equipment 

and supplies were being moved out of the post by the Army and speedy 

action was necessary to hold them. Detailed list is available of the 

supplies and equipment reserved for use of the extension. It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve steps taken 
by the Treasurer and other off icers of the College 
to obtain supplies and equipment for the Devens 
extension and to authorise the inclusion of these 
materials in leases to be executed with the Army. 

It was also 

VOTED .; To recommend that the Trustees approve leasing of 

grounds and buildings needed for use as dormitories, 
classrooms, laboratories and other purposes. 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

It was also 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 

Chairman to appoint a special committee of five as 
an executive committee to act in the name of and 
for the Board of Trustees in the execution of 
leasee, contracts, and other financial agreements 
necessary to the development and operation of the 
Devens branch. 

Chairman Boyden said that he was disappointed to read that no 
facilities are available for married veterans. He requested that 
further study be made before final announcement is made. It was 
suggested that the College request the use of Devens Crest and any 
other facilities which might house married veterans. 

The meeting w$s adjourned at 4 o'clock. 



Special 

Committee of 5 
as an Executive 
Committee 



Chairman 




!<TZ2r<&tfC9 ^ Secretary 



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Trustees of 

Massachusetts 
State College 
at Fort Devens 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR DEVENS EXTENSION 

OF MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

June 26, 1946, 6:30 P.M., Parker House, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Bartlett, Boyden, Carraichael, Charles W. 

Cole, Frederick E. Cole, Cluverius, Desmond, 
Conant, Ell, Healy, Hubbard, Keleher, 
Mrs. Leach, Mrs. McNamara, Marsh, Saltonstall, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Baker, Treasurer 
Hawley, Secretary Burke 

In addition the following were present by 
invitation of the Board: Col* Knowlton, 
Capt. , Harroran of the Fort Devens Command, 
Mr* Stratton of the State Department of 
Education, Dr. Ralph A. Van Meter, who will 
be Acting President of M.S.C. beginning July 1 

His Excellency Maurice J. Tobin, Governor of the Commonwealth, 

attended the dinner and swore in as Trustees of Massachusetts State 

College Devens extension the following: 

Dr. Charles W. Cole, President of Amherst College 
Dr. James B. Conant, President of Harvard University 
Very Rev. William L. Keleher, S*J«, President of 

Boston College 
Dr. James L. Marsh, President of Boston University 
Dr. Carl S. Ell, President of Northeastern University 
Admiral W. T. Cluverius, President of W.P.I. 
Very Rev. William Healy, S.J., President of Holy 

Cross College 



The Governor thanked the new Trustees for their willingness 



to give of their time and energy in creating and operating a college 
for Massachusetts veterans. The Governor explained that he would be 
unable to remain for the meeting as it was necessary for him to 
appear at Boys* State conducted by the American Legion at Massachu- 
setts State College in Amherst, 

After the dinner the meeting was called to order by Chairman 

Bartlett. President Baker expressed his thanks to the college 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

presidents for their willingness to share ?dth the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College in the tremendous undertaking at the Devens 
extension. He expressed thanks also to the Array representatives for the 
fine cooperation they have given to the College. 

Chairman Bartlett said that the Board of Trustees of Massa- 
chusetts State College had appointed a sub-committee in June to prepare 
plans for the opening of the Devens Extension and to report to the en- 
larged board this evening. He called upon Dr. Boyden, Chairman of the 
sub-committee, to present report of his committee. 

Dr. Boyden reported that his sub-committee had submitted a 
bill to the Legislature authorizing the Governor to appoint nine Massa- 
chusetts college presidents to the Board of Trustees of Massachusetts 
State College to act as a governing board for the Devens Extension, 
This legislation also requested authorization for the operation of the 
Devens Extension* The committee further requested and obtained appro- 
priation of $1,300,000 to cover cost of the Devens Extension through 
June 30, 1947. 

Dr. Boyden then presented a series of recommendations from his Recommendations 
sub-committee which after discussion and modification were approved by 



the Board as follows: 



1. That the Chairmen of the Board appoint an executive 
committee of five to act in the name of and for the 
Board of Trustees in the execution of leases, con- 
tracts and other financial agreements necessary to 
the development and operation of the Devens Exten- 
sion; also to act in the name of and for the Board 
of Trustees in appointing a vice-president and 
other executive officers; this executive committee 
shall also include ex officio the Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees, the President of Massachusetts 
State College, and the vice r president in charge of 
the Devens Extension. 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

In accordance with this vote, Chairman Bartlett appointed 

the following as an executive committees Dr. Boyden, Chairman, 

Trustees Carmichael, Desmond, Keleher, Cluverius. 

2. That the executive officer of the Devens Extension 
shall be a vice-president. 

3« That two deans shall be appointed by the executive 
committee upon the recommendation of the Dean and 
the President of Massachusetts State College. 

4. That admissions to the Devens Extension be handled 
at Massachusetts State College by the Registrar and 
admissions committee; that an Assistant Registrar 
be appointed upon recommendation of the Dean and 
President of Massachusetts State College. 

5» That Professors and Heads of Departments be 
appointed by the executive committee upon the 
recommendation of the vice-president in consultation 
with the President pf the College; that teaching 
personnel below the rank of Heads of Departments 
be appointed by the vice-president upon the 
recommendation from Heads of Departments and the 
Deans. 

6. That the Librarian and assistants, Director of Health 
and assistants, Director of Recreation and 
Athletics and assistants shall be appointed by the 
vice-president . 

7. That the chief fiscal officer at the extension 
shall be appointed by the executive committee upon 
the recommendation of the Treasurer and the Presi- 
dent of Massachusetts State College; Assistant 
Treasurer, bookkeepers, etc* to be appointed by the 
chief fiscal officer after consultation with the 
Treasurer of the College and with the approval of 
the vice-president* 

8. That the general superintendent of the plant be 
appointed by the vice-president upon recommendation 
of the chief fiscal officer of the extension. 

9. That the manager of dining halls be appointed by 
the vice-president on the recommendation of the 
chief fiscal officer; this manager to organize force 
and facilities and if dining halls are operated as 
concessions to be supervisor; that the executive 
committee be empowered to select a concessionaire on 
the recommendation of the vice-president. 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

10, That personnel to supervise postal, express service 
and transportation be selected by the chief fiscal 
officer and be responsible to him, 

11, That clerical staff be under supervision of various 
administrative, instructional and operative depart- 
ments and be selected through the deans and 
appointed by the vice-president. 

12, That the curriculum for the first year be limited 
to basic fundamental courses with certain variations 
as may be justified by selection of majors by 
veterans; curriculum to be substantially as 
described in the catalogue of the College; that 
changes in curriculum be made only under authority 
of the Board of Trustees of the College. 

13, That brief printed announcement of opening of the 
Devens Extension, courses to be offered, and arrange- 
ments as to living conditions and expenses be pre- 
pared immediately to Assistant Registrar of the 
College in contacting veterans now listed as in- 
terested in Devens, and others who may apply, that 
no catalogue of the Devens Extension similar to the 
College catalogue is considered necessary; that all 
publicity as to the Devens Extension shall be 
approved by the President of Massachusetts State 
College. 

Dr. Boyden reported on his unsuccessful search. for a president 
of the Devens Extension. He said his committee had reluctantly come to 
the conclusion that it would not be possible to find a "name educator" 
to head the Extension. For this reason the committee had recommended 
that the head of the Devens Extension be called vice-president. 

He reported that the committee has five names which have been 
offered for consideration as vice-president. There was some discussion 
of possible candidates, and it was 






VOTED : To authorize the Executive Committee with President 
Baker to select a vice-president for the Devens 
Extension. 



President Baker reported that he had obtained that day a copy 
of the enabling legislation for the Devens Extension, This legislation 



. Vice President 
at Fort Devens 






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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

was changed somewhat from the recommendations of Dr. Boyden 1 s 
committee. No veterans may be matriculated at Devens after 
September 1, 1947 • Further, the Board of Trustees for the Devens 
Extension is automatically dissolved at the end of five years. 

Dr. Conant pointed out that the Board is morally obligated 
to carry through to completion of the undergraduate degree the 
veterans who enter at Devens this fall and next. If it is not 
possible for these men to transfer to Massachusetts State College or 
to other colleges^ the Board must arrange for the completion of their 
work at Devens. 

Chairman Bartlett called on Colonel Knowlton for report on 
conditions at Devens. Colonel Knowlton said that the Post is to be 



deactivated as of June 30, 1946. At that time the State must take 

- 

over the property and equipment which has been declared surplus by 
; the Army and made available for the College Extension. He said the 
Army needs as soon as possible a definition of the area to be taken 
over and a detailed list of all property. He suggested that it would 
be helpful for the Board to send individuals to the camp immediately 
to pick out the property and see that it is placed in the proper ware- 
houses and held for use of the College Extension. 

Colonel Knowlton also said that many civilian employees 

are terminating their service at Devens on June 30th and might be 

\ available for service to the College. Included in this group are 

typists, janitors, groundskeepers, laborers and many other classi- 
E fications. 

He suggested also that the Superintendent of Plant for the 
College should go to Devens soon to get acquainted with the utilities 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

and to receive maintenance machinery from the Army, 

The Colonel reported that the Onion National Bank of Lowell 

has maintained a branch bank at Devens and is willing to continue the 

branch if the College so desires. 

Chairman Bartlett thanked the Colonel for his report and for 

his fine cooperation. The Chairman thanked Dr. Boyden for the fine work 

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done by his committee in preparing for this evening* s meeting. 
The meeting was adjourned at 9*20 P.M. 







Chairman 



Secretary 



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Chief 

Fiscal 

Officer 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
DEVENS EXTENSION OF MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

June 26, 1946, 9:30 P.M., Parker House, Boston 

PRESENT: Chairman Boyden, Carmichael, Keleher, 

Cluverius, Desmond, Bartlett, President 
Baker, Dean Van Meter, Secretary Burke 






Union National 
Bank of Lowell 

branch 



It was agreed that a Chief Fiscal Officer should be appointed 
immediately so that he could report at Devens and begin setting up the 
business organization. On the recommendation of Treasurer Hawley and 

President Baker, it was 

VOTED? To appoint Gunnar E. Erickson, now College Business 
— — Officer, as Chief Fiscal Officer for the Devens Ex- 
tension. 

It was also 

VOTED s To authorize Mr. Erickson to proceed with the appoint- 
ment of subordinate business and fiscal personnel 
pending the appointment of a vice-president. 

It was 

VOTED; To fix Mr. Erickson* s salary at #5*000 per year 
subject to the approval of the Commission on Ad- 
ministration and Finance. 

It was 

VOTED: To allow the Union National Bank of Lowell to con- 

" tinue its branch at Devens with the understanding 

that there would be no obligation to the College. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that officers of the College had 
been obliged to proceed with the listing of property, buildings, and 
grounds which would be required for operation of the Devens Exten- 
sion. These college officers have been at Camp Devens and have con- 
scientiously done their best to select such items as will be required. 
The Treasurer had with him long lists of equipment and buildings and 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

requested that the Trustees authorize the inclusion of these lists in 

leases to be prepared for approval of the Executive Committee. He 

pointed out that most of the property will be acquired at no cost. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize inclusion of the lists of property, 
buildings, and grounds as prepared by the 
Treasurer in lease to be prepared for approval 
by the Executive Committee • 

It was 

VOTED : That the Executive Committee would meet at Chair- 
man Bartlett's office - Ely, Bradford, Bartlett, 
Thompson and Brown, 49 Federal Street, Boston, 
Monday, July 1, at 11:00 A.M. 

It was 

VOTE D; To fix the salary of the vice-president at $7500 

and house subject to the approval of the Commission 
on Administration and Finance. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:15 P.M. 



Vice-president 
salary of 




Secretary 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



00 

so 

CO 



Deans of 
Massachusetts 
State College 
at Fort Devens 



Stokes, Joseph 
Morgan - dean 



Williams, 
Wentworth 



- dean 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF MASSACHUSETTS 

STATE COLLEGE AT FORT DEVENS 

July 1, 1946, 11:00 A.M., Mr. Bartlett* s Office, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENTS Trustees Bartlett, Desmond, Boyden, 

Keleher, Carmichael, President Baker, 
Dean Van Meter, Secretary Burke 

Chairman Bartlett announced that the main purpose of the 
meeting was to interview candidates for executive positions at Fort 
Devens* 

The Committee then interviewed five candidates and con- 
sulted two others by telephone. It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To elect Dr. Joseph Morgan Stokes and Dr. Wentworth 
Williams as Deans of Massachusetts State College at 
Fort Devens at annual salary of &540Q . 

The Committee was reluctant to eleet Deans before finding 
a Vice-President but it was felt that the matter was too urgent to be 
put over until a Vice-President was located. 

Dr. Stokes is a graduate of Presbyterian College of South 
Carolina, has an M.A. degree from Yale, was a Rhodes scholar and has 
a Ph.D. from Yale in 1935 • He has been on the faculty of Presbyterian 
College of South Carolina and of Vfesleyan University. He was a Naval 
Commander in charge of ground instruction training at Pensacola where 
the student body averaged 5*000 to 6,000 and the staff 1,500 to 1,600. 

Dr. Wentworth Williams is a graduate of Williams College and 
holds the degree Ed.D. from Columbia* His thesis at Columbia was on 
the administration of higher education. He taught for two years at 
Syracuse University and for 14 years at Boston University. He was an 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

officer in World War Ij in World War II he was assistant commander of 
the West Point prep school at Devens, served overseas as chief of staff 
at Casablanca and later was dean of the Army Study Center at Florence, 
Italy. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5 o'clock. 



Secretary 



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Hodnett, Edward 
Vice-President 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF MASSACHUSETTS 

STATE COLLEGE AT FORT DEVENS 

July 10, 1946, 11:00 A.m., Mr. Bartlett 1 s Office, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT ? Trustees Bartlett, Cluverius, Boyden, 

Keleher, Ganaichael, Desmond, President 
Baker, Acting President Van Meter, 
Secretary Burke 

Chairman Bartlett announced that the meeting was a continua- 
tion of last week's session in which the Executive Committee sought a 
Vice-President to head Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens. 
Three candidates were interviewed and after discussion, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED s To elect Dr. Edward Hodnett as Vice-President 
of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens 
at annual salary of |7500 and house. 









Dr» Hodnett received his A.B. from Columbia University in 
1922, his Ph.D. from Columbia in 1935, studied in England for nearly 
Vice-President two years - one year as a Cutting Traveling Fellow. 

He was at Columbia from 1922 to 1940 in both teaching and 
administration; 1940 to 1942 he was dean of the College of Arts and 
Science and Professor of English at the University of Newark; 1942 to 
1945 be was in the United States Navy where his main responsibility 
was as an educational officer. At one time he was in charge of the 
educational program of 2,000 men in naval aviation. He also directed 
the V-12 program at Harvard and later at Tufts. 

Dr. Van Meter reviewed progress to date on the canvassing 
of prospective students, betters have been sent to the 2800 men whose 
names were supplied by the various Massachusetts colleges and to 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

hundreds of others who have since written to the College, Information 
has been sent to Veterans Guidance Centers in the various communities of 
Massachusetts and to the other colleges. Applications are beginning to 
come in as a result of these mailings. 

Mr* Thomas II. Buckley, Chairman of the Commission on Administra- 
tion and Finance, and Major George J. Cronin, State Purchasing Agent, 
attended during part of the meeting to discuss with the committee the 
need for rapid action in acquiring supplies and equipment to be used at 
Fort Devens. Mr. Buckley said that a great deal of equipment is now 

■ 

available free from various surplus sources. However, other colleges 
are making aggressive efforts to obtain this material and he urged that 
the Trustees take steps to insure the obtaining of sufficient supplies 
and equipment for use at Devens. Dr. Van Meter said that the College has 
prepared a list of all needed supplies and equipment and that this list 
is in the mail today addressed to Mr. Buckley. Mr. Buckley also urged 
that Mr, Erickson, Chief Fiscal Officer at Fort Devens, be given backing 
and full authority of the Trustees in hiring assistants to carry on his 



work. Mr. Bartlett assured Mr. Buckley that Mr. Erickson would be so 

instructed immediately. 

There was brief discussion of the terms of employment for 

members of the professional staff at Fort Devens and, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Chairman Bartlett to fix terms of 
employment on the recommendation of President 
Baker. 

The meeting was adjourned at is 30 P.M. 



Terms of 
Employment 




- Secretary 



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Division Heads - 
salary of 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

REVISED MD APPROVED 
MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
OF THE MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FORT DEVENS 

August 22, 194-6, 2:00 P.M., Mr. Bartlett 1 s Office, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Cluverius, Keleher, 
Carmichael, Boyden, President Baker, 
Dr. Hodnett, Dean Van Meter, Mr. Erickson, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 

Dr. Hodnett reported on progress of the College at Devens. 
They will definitely open October 1 and he believes with a good 
faculty and approximately lpOO students. The College will operate 
on a three-semester or three-term plan. Dr. Hodnett proposes to di- 
vide the curriculum into three divisions - Humanities, Social Studies, 
and Science. He feels that the salary of division heads at Massachu- 
setts State College; namely, $4500, is not sufficient for his division 
heads inasmuch as Devens college will operate on the three-term plan. 
On his recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To approve a salary of $5,000 for division heads 
at Devens, provided this rate can be cleared with 
the Commission on Administration and Finance. 



Dr. Hodnett reported further that he is proposing to employ 

a faculty of 110 teachers. He has received 4.00 applications and has 

accepted 4-3 men to date. There was discussion of a list of recommended 

appointees, and it was 

VOTED: To authorize appointment of the following men as , 
recommended by Dr. Hodnett, appointments to be 
effective September 1 or as soon thereafter as 
the individuals report for duty: 



Albert 0* Porter, Head of Division of Social Studies 

Theodore Sottery^ Professor of Chemistry and possible 
Head of the Division of Science 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Herbert A. Perkins, Professor of Mathematics 
and Head of the Division of Records and Guidance 

George H. Genzmer, Professor of English 

William S, Knickerbocker, Professor of English 

R, Victor Stout, Professor and Head of Division 
of Physical Education 

Robert E. Bacon, Professor of English 

Ervard D. Ericson, Professor of English and Head 
of Division of Humanities 

Alexander H, Rice, Professor of History- 
Walter Kerrigan, Senior Medical Officer 
Hendrick M, Bo shard, professor of German 

George S, Gleason, Professor of Engineering 
Drawing 

George H. R, O'Lonnell, Professor of Physics 
and perhaps Head of Division of Science 

President Baker reviewed his suggestion made that morning to 
the Executive Committee of Massachusetts State College that he be 
allowed to send 300 veteran students to Devens if the new Alumni dormi- 
tories are not ready in time this fall. It was felt that there would be 
problems both at Amherst and at Devens if this has to be done. However, 
the Executive Committee 






VOTED ; To authorize President Baker to send 300 students 
to Devens if necessary. 

On the recommendation of Dr. Hodnett, it was 

VOTED : To authorize room rent at Devens of $2,00 per week, 
Dr, Hodnett pointed out that the men will not have 
separate rooms but will live army barracks style, 
hence the low rate. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize Dr. Hodnett to enter into contract 
for feeding students at Devens with the under- 
standing that the contract is to be approved by 



Room Rent 



Feeding of 
Students 



61 



Board 
Rate 



Concessions 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

the Commission on Administration and Finance. 
Dr. Hodnett has three bids none in excess of 
$10.50 per man per week. It was 

VOTED; To authorize Dr. Hodnett to make arrangements 

for local concessions such as barber shop, shoe 
repair shop and other services required on the 
campus at Devens. Concessions are to be let 
after consultation with the Treasurer of the 
College • 

Dr. Hodnett reported great difficulty in obtaining chemical 

supplies and other laboratory supplies and equipment. If these are 

not available hy October 1, it may be necessary to teach Sophomore 

courses such as Economics and Psychology the first year and to give the 

laboratory courses later. It was 

VOTED ; To authorize Dr. Hodnett to shift the teaching 

schedule if he cannot have laboratories in opera- 
tion by the time college opens. 

Dr. Hodnett reported a need for funds for the operation of 

! athletics, college store, and other items on a revolving fund basis. 

The Commission on Administration and Finance has refused to allow the 

use of State funds for setting up revolving fund accounts. It was 

finally agreed that the best plan might be to use appropriated State 

funds for the purchase of needed athletic equipment and to revert in- 



■ 



come from this source to the State Treasury. It was also agreed that 






the College Store might best be operated as a concession. 

Mr. Erickson reported on the proposed use of the Devens 
budget of $1,300,000. Salaries will cost $691,250, supplies $68,500, 
plant operation $171,635, making a total of $93I,135« In addition, it 
will cost approximately $815,000 for conversion of buildings for furni- 
ture and equipment. The Federal Housing Authority is expected to pay 
a considerable portion of the cost of conversion. Chairman Bartlett 



I 



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informed Mr. Erickson and Dr. Hodnett that it was imperative that they 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



21 



hold within the budget of $1,300,000 and to cancel any proposed work 

necessary to keep costs within the budget* It was 

VOTED : To approve house rental rates for faculty members 
in accordance with the rent schedule adopted by 
the Federal Public Housing Authority. 



Dr. Hodnett raised question as to whether a veteran student 
resident of Massachusetts might be allowed to pay §100 tuition out of 
his own pocket rather than the rate established for veterans and normally 
paid by the Veterans 1 Administration. Chairman Bartlett said that no 
such payment would be allowed. 

Dr. Hodnett raised question as to the use of busses owned by 

the College at Devens. Requests have 'oeen made for the use of the 

busses for transporting children of faculty members to the public school 

in Ayer, for use by faculty members in going from home to class and for 

use by athletic teams on trips. It was agreed that a schedule of pay- 

ments should be adopted for any use of busses and that Dr. Hodnett 

should work out carefully the uses which he considered legitimate. On 

the recommendation of Treasurer Hawley, it was 

VOTED : To approve signature of Dr. Edward Hodnett and 
Gunnar E. Erickson on billing schedules. 



House Rentals 

for 
Faculty Members 

Tuition 



It was also 

VOTED : To authorize G. E. Erickson, Chief Fiscal Officer, 
Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens, to sign 
any and all checks, withdrawal orders, drafts, certi- 
ficates of deposit and all other documents required 
to be signed or endorsed in the name and behalf of 
Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens or the 
Board of Trustees of said Massachusetts State 
College at Fort Devens in order to deal with, with- 
draw from and deposit to any accounts now existing 
or that may exist in the future in Union National 
Bank of Lowell said authority to include his right 
to sign or endorse any paper or document that may be 
required to be signed in connection with any 



22 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

transaction that may take place by said Massa- 
chusetts State College at Fort Devens or the 
Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State College 
at Fort Devens in any financial transaction that 
he has with or through said Union National Bank 
of Lowell including dealings with certified 
checks and foreign exchange. Such authorization 
is to be effective when Mr. Erickson is bonded. 
It was agreed that Mr. Erickson 1 s bond should be 
in the amount of $10,000 and that there should 
be blanket bond coverage in the amount of §10,000 
on all other employees at Fort Devens who handle 
cash. 



was 



00 






I 



VOTED; To require bond in the amount of $10,000 covering 
Daniel Sullivan, Senior Accountant, Massachusetts 
State College at Fort Devens. Mr. Sullivan is not 
yet authorized to sign checks but t-he purpose of 
the bond is to pave the way for later authorization 
for his signing checks as alternate to Mr. Erickson. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 P.M. 




I 



^^Secretary 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF 
MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FORT DEVENS 

October 1, 19^6, 1:15 P.M., Fort Devens 

Chairman 3artlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



His Excellency Maurice J. Tobin, Governor, 
Chairman Dartlett, Trustees Seleher, 
Carmichael, Boyden, Ell, Healy, Cluverius, 
Brett, Deely, Mrs. McNamara, Taber, Compton, 
Baxter, Iloftyzer, Charles Cole, Hubbard, 
Brown, President Baker, Vice President 
Hodnett, Dean Van Meter, Dean Machmer, Dean 
Williams, Dean Stokes, Fiscal Officer 
Erickson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call. 
It was 

VOTED: To dispense with reading of minutes of the last 
previous meeting. 

Dr. Hodnett reported registration of 1300 students. He said 

that while facilities are not just as he >.ouid wish them, the program was 

going forward as scheduled. A staff of 265 persons has been recruited 

of whom 10S are faculty. Seventy per cent of the members of the faculty 

are veterans. Reconstruction of some of the buildings is about to begin 

but the college program has started regardless. Dr. Hodnett paid tribute 

to the Commission on Administration and Finance for its splendid coopera- 
tion in preparing facilities for college opening. 

Dr. Hodnett suggested that the theatre on the campus be Theatre 
operated for the use of students and that the income be used to benefit 
student activities. Question was raisea as to authority of the Trustees 
to establish a revolving fund. After discussion, it was 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



Renovation of 
Dormitories 



Federal Works 
Agency 



Architect - 
John M. Gray 



VOTED,; To authorize Dr. Hodnett to operate the theatre 
on a revolving fund basis with income to be used 
for the support of student activities and with 
the understanding that this procedure would be 
submitted to state officials for approval. 

Upon the written request of Thomas H. Buckley, Chairman of 



the Commission on Administration and Finance, the following lour actions 

were taken so that there might be no delay in necessary renovation of 

buildings. It was 

VOTED : To authorize Dr. Edward Hodnett, Vice President, 
Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens, to 
sign contract with John Bowen Company providing 
for renovation of dormitories at Massachusetts 
State College at Fort Devens. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize Dr. Edward Hodnett, Vice President 
of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens, 
to sign lease from Federal Y\!orks Agency providing 
for the use of buildings at Massachusetts State 
College at Fort Devens. 



John Bowen Co. 



It was 

■ 

VOTED ; To approve action of the Commission on Ad- 
ministration and Finance securing services of 
architect John M. Gray, 175 High Street, Boston, 
to act in renovation of buildings at Massachusetts 
State College at Fort Devens. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve action of the Commission on Administra- 
tion and Finance in awarding contract to John 
Bowen Company for renovation of dormitories at 
Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens and 
charging cost of such renovation in the amount of 
$210,000 to appropriation for the maintenance of 

the College at Devens. 

I 

3 

Fiscal Officer Erickson reported on expenditures to date 
and on plans for the use of the budget for the remainder of the year. 
The total budget requested by the Department of Education for Devens 



i 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

was 11,371,000. The General Court reduced this to $1,300,000. 
Mr* Erickson now estimates the cost for one year to be §1, 50f>>800. Ad- 
ministration costs have been reduced $40,000 from the original estimate 
and Instruction costs reduced $50,750. Operation of Plant costs are in- 
creased by $95 t 550 because of the scattered nature of the buildings, the 
lack of central heating, and the fact that there is a great accumulation 
of maintenance work left by the Army. Conversion costs and purchase of 
laboratory equipment was increased by $90,000 over original estimates 
because the barracks as left by the Army were not suitable for college 
dormitory purposes. Also it proved necessary to bu^ some equipment 
which it was hoped could be obtained on rental basis. 

Governor Tobin congratulated President Baker, Dr. Hodnett, 
and others who have accomplished the miracle of making the college ready 
by October 1. He said that only a miracle of effort had achieved the 
tremendous task of preparing the facilities, organizing the educational 
program, and bringing staff and students together by the October 1 
deadline. Governor Tobin said that he is confident that the college 
will hold to the highest educational standards so that Massachusetts 
veterans will get the best possible education and Devens college will 
rank second to none in the Commonwealth. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 P.M. 




Chairman 



Secretary 






26 



Meals at 
Devens 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
OF MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FORT DEVENS 
1946 
November 4>/l 1:00 A » M »> Chairman Barblett 1 5 Office, Boston 

At the request of Dr. Boyden, Chairman of the 
Executive Committee, Mr. Bartlett presided. 

PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Keleher, Carmichael, 
Cluverius, Desmond, Boyden, President 
Baker, Secretary Burke 

Chairman Bartlett said that he had received request from 

the Assistant Attorney General for the Attorney General and his 

■ 

Assistant to make a brief statement concerning board arrangements for 

students at Fort Devens. The members of the Committee agreed to in- 

j 

vite Mr. Barnes and Mr. Rowell to the meeting. 

Attorney General Barnes reported that he had a petition 
signed by various students at Fort Devens requesting permission to be 
allowed to eat where and how they pleased and not to be required to 
eat at the boarding hall provided by the College. Seventy-five stu- 

| 

dents had visited hira in his office at the State House to implement 
this petition. H e said that it was his impression that the require- 
ment that all students eat at the boarding hall was put in force after 
Devens had opened. It was represented to him that the food was un- 
believably bad. ^e said that he had letter from the President of the 
Revere Sugar Refining Company, the father of one of the students, to 
that effect. Further, he said it was his understanding the contract 
was not let to the lowest bidder. He has an investigation underway at 
the present time. He believes that if the Trustees issue an order 
compelling students to eat at any one boarding hall there goes with 
it the necessity of providing good food. He is fairly well convinced 



■ 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

that this is not being done. If these premises are correct, the Trustees 
should do something about it. 

Upon question from Chairman Bartlett, Mr. Barnes said that he 
is the Attorney of the Board of Trustees and that he will gladly give ad- 
vice upon request. Chairman Bartlett said that the Trustees have adopted 
the rule of requiring students to eat their meals on the campus, ^his 
rule is common practice for freshmen in many colleges. All the colleges 
and schools represented by the Board members present today have such rule 
for their freshman students. He asked Mr. Barnes whether such regulation 
is permissible for this Board of Trustees. Mr. Barnes said probably yes. 

Chairman Bartlett said that the Trustees are faced with a 
peculiar situation at Devens. Everything is new, there was a rush to 
organize, and since Devens is one mile from Ayer, a small town, it was a 
difficult question as to how to feed the students. The Trustees ad- 



vertised for bids for a food concession. Of 14. concessionaires who con- 
sidered the proposition, only 6 finally submitted bids. 



It is Mr. Bartlett' s impression that the low bidder was con- 



sidered unable to perform satisfactorily on the basis of advertised bids. 
The bid was awarded to the second low bidder but this firm found that it 
was unable to carry out the terms of the bid. This firm, therefore, 
turned to Crotty Brothers who accepted the contract at the price of the 
second low bid. This procedure was approved by the Commission on Ad- 
ministration and Finance. 

Chairman Bartlett then asked Mr. Barnes whether he would 
recommend that the Trustees dispense with the services of Crotty Brothers 
until some new arrangement could be made. Mr. Barnes said no - that 
that would not be practicable as the students would then have no place to 



27 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

eat. He suggested that Crotty Brothers go ahead and meantime the 
Trustees readvertise for bids - then decide what bid to accept. 

Mr. Rowell said that he did not question the right of the 
Trustees to require students to eat on campus but that the students 
did not know of this requirement when they entered College. 

President Carmichael said that at Dartmouth, the students 
are required to eat at the Commons unless the college transfers their 
board money to an approved organization such as a fraternity. Tufts 
requires all freshmen to eat on campus and pay by the term. 

Admiral Cluverius said that Y«orcester Polytechnic Institute 
requires freshmen to eat on campus and p©y for all meals. Father 
Keleher said the same was true at Boston College. 

Dr. Boyden said that it is obvious that the Trustees cannot 
make a new arrangement overnight. He supported the right of the 
Trustees to require all students to eat on campus. He advised re- 
advertising for bids and in the meantime continuing arrangements with 
! Crotty Brothers. 

There was then discussion of the immediate problem that the 

- 
College has suspended from classes those students who have refused to 

eat at the boarding hall. If the Trustees are to operate an educa- 
tional institution they must control the students. Why should the stu- 
dents be reinstated in view of their refusal to abide by the rules of 
the College? 

Mr. Rowell maintained that students should be immediately 
reinstated because the food is so bad the Trustees cannot require them 
to eat at the boarding hall. He would excuse students from eating 
there until a new contract is let. Mr. Barnes suggested that the students 



l 



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29 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

who have purchased meal tickets be required to eat at Crotty Brothers. 
Those students who do not purchase tickets should not be permitted to eat 
any meals at Crotty Brothers. 

President Carraichael suggested that Trustees should now de- 
termine the fact of the goodness or badness of the food served at Devens. 
lie said that college students are likely to complain even if they are 
served good food. He has yet to be convinced that the food is bad. 

Chairman Bartlett raised the question, if the Trustees ad- 
vertise for new bids, what will happen in the event that a better bid 
cannot be obtained. The present price at Devens is lower than at any 
of the institutions represented in this meeting except Massachusetts 
State College which supplies much of the food for the boarding hall from 
the college farms and orchards. 

Dr. Boyden pointed out that under present conditions, good food 
cannot be obtained regularly. He said that he has talked with students 
from Devens and his belief is that the food is not bad. Most of the boys 
are content with it. 

Various members of the committee expressed the belief that if 
the College were to advertise for bids, contractors would fear to bid in 
view of the present situation and inevitably the price would go up - thus 
the majority of students would suffer from increased cost of food. Any 
food situation is easy to correct if price is of no consequence. How- 

■ 

ever, the students are paying for the food and the Trustees must keep in 
mind the limited funds of the students. 

Mr. Barnes said that he had 10 witnesses ready to appear before 
the committee as to the bad quality of the food. Chairman Bartlett re- 
quested that he pick two students of the ten to be heard. Mr. Barnes 



>0 






MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

brought in Charles Carroll and Trueman Jackson. These students re- 
ported that for the first two weeks the food was not too good but that 
after that the quality improved. They said they are not now complain- 
ing of the quality of the food but rather of the requirement that they 
must eat on campus with no rebate for meals not eaten there. They 
said that for five days in a row starchy food was served for the main 
course, that breakfast consisted of french toast or boiled eggs which 
were too soft, or of pancakes, and that hydrated eggs were served. 

Mr. Bartlett reviewed for the benefit of these students the 
discussions preceding their entry. He pointed out that the Trustees 
could at any time obtain better food but inevitably this would come 
at a nigher cost and that it would be the students who would pay. He 
said it was the feeling of the Trustees that if bids were advertised 
for again, the cost would rise for the 900 students who are satisfied 
with the present arrangement. He told the students that they were 
getting their food at Devens at less cost than at any of the colleges 
represented at this meeting except Massachusetts State. He asked the 
students whether the Trustees should abolish eating arrangements 
entirely at Devens, The students said no. They would like to investi- 
gate certain caterers to see if a better deal could be made. 

President Carmichael said that it is the tendency of colleges 
today to require all students to eat on campus, that there are certain 

i 

educational advantages in such requirement. 



Question was raised as to whether the college itself could 
operate a boarding hall and it was pointed out to the students that 
no funds were appropriated to the college for this purpose. Upon 
leaving the meeting, the students left a letter setting forth their 



r** 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



31 



request to be allowed to eat where they pleased. This letter was read 
by Attorney General Barnes. 

Dr. Doyden said that students generally from Maine to 
California would be found to complain of their food. It is his belief 
that 35 to 50 percent of students any where at any one time might complain 
of the food even in better times. 

Upon invitation of the committee, Dr. Hodnett, Dean Stokes, 
Dean Williams and Mr. Erickson, Fiscal Officer, appeared before the 
committee. Dr. Hodnett explained the basis of the bids for the food con- 
cession at Fort Devens. Ke said that a student government was formed at 
Fort Devens as soon as the college was opened and that he would like to 



have the Trustees hear from two members of the student senate. Gerald 



McDonald and Joseph Dilman then appeared to represent the student senate. 
These students said that at the beginning of the college there was some 
misunderstanding of the need for purchasing meal tickets, that the need 
had been explained to the students by Dean Stokes and that the senate 
was now convinced that present arrangements offer the only practical so- 
lution to the problem of feeding the students at Devens. They said it is 
the belief of the student senate that regardless as to whether the meals 
were good or bad, certain of the students should never have marched on 
the State House and enlisted the aid of politics to overrule a decision 
of the Board of Trustees. They granted that it would be possible to im- 
prove the quality of the food service but that the college has been 
operating for only one month and conditions are improving. They said 
they believe that the students would like to have more facts about the 
food situation and that if they had these facts they would be content. 



Jb €£ 






MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

For the benefit of the members of the student senate, Chair- 
man Bartlett reviewed the discussions which had taken place earlier in 
the meeting • 

Dr. Kodnett reported that the menus at Devens are planned by 
a former Army Colonel w ^° na( * charge of meal planning for the Army 
Ground Forces, This man is an expert in meal planning and approves the 
quality and quantity of food served. Menus are submitted for the 
approval of Dean Stokes one week in advance. Each day's service in- 

■ 

eludes 3500 calories* He reported that the mess hall is set up on the 
basis of Army feeding and that until the equipment could be changed 
certain methods of serving were inevitable. The college administration 
has requested changes in the main dining hall and has attempted to work 
out some adjustments with the concessionaire. He reported that he had 
discussed with Crotty Brothers changing to a cafeteria plan with food 

- 

choice for students if such should be the will of the Trustees. Crotty 
said that he would be willing to consider this plan only if the college 
provided equipment which would permit this type of service. The 
question now in Dr. Hodnett's mind is whether the college will continue 
to exist long enough to justify new equipment for the boarding hall. 

Each member of the college administration present, President 
Baker, Dr. Hodnett, Dean Stokes, Dean Williams, Fiscal Officer 
Erickson and Secretary Burke, testified to eating at the dining hall 
at Devens and being satisfied that the food was reasonably good. Mr. 
Erickson said further that some of the Devens faculty eat there quite 
regularly and that inquiries and inspections have been made frequently 
which lead the officers at Devens to believe that the food is 
reasonably good. 



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33 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Commissioner Desmond said that at the time the budget for 
Devens was prepared, time was too short before the opening of college 
to permit the organization of a boarding hall operated by the college it- 
self. Therefore, those submitting the budget recommended feeding on a 
concession basis. 

Chairman Bartlett then discussed possible conclusions with 
Attorney General Barnes, Mr. Barnes agreed that the Trustees have the 
legal right to suspend students from classes for failure to conform with 
college regulations. Ur. Bartlett asked him whether he was now convinced 
that the food is reasonable and the price is satisfactory. Mr. Barnes 
agreed that he did. Chairman Bartlett then asked what the Trustees 
should do - whether they should advertise and run the risk of getting a 
higher price. 

Admiral Cluverius said that the presidents of Massachusetts 
colleges were firmly behind the program at Fort Devens, that they con- 
sidered it their duty to operate the best college possible, and that it 
is his belief that Devens is the best college of its kind in the country. 
It needs the backing of the presidents of Massachusetts colleges if it is 
to succeed. We cannot let it fail now. 

Dr. Boyden said that the Trustees must maintain discipline but 
at the same time he advised that the Trustees should do everything 
possible to improve food conditions. We want the students back in class, 
as the present situation cannot go on. He advised giving the students 
a time limit in which they would be reo x uired to purchase meal tickets. 
Those who fail to do so within the time limit should be requested to 
withdraw from college. 



84 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Chairman Bartlett canvassed the committee one by one and 

every member agreed with Dr. Boyden 1 s suggestion. It was then 

unanimously 

VOTED: To support the action of the administration at 
Devens in suspending from classes those stu- 
dents who have failed to comply with college 
regulations with respect to the payment of 
board, that these students be given until 
Wednesday, November 6, at 5s 00 P.M. to comply. 
If any student fails to comply by that time, 
the Trustees expect the administration to 
suspend him from college. Meantime the stu- 
dents are eligible to return to classes. 

Attorney General Barnes said that he concurred in this vote. 

! He thanked the committee for the opportunity of conferring with them. 

He said that he was impressed with the experience and wisdom of the 

educators present and that he had faith in the Tightness of their de- 

cisions. He urged that frequent checks be made on the quality of the 

food. 

President Baker explained that State House regulations re- 

■ 
quire that a Trustee or officer of the Board of Trustees approve ex- 
penditures from appropriations to the College at Devens. Upon his 
recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Gunnar E. Erickson, Fiscal Officer 
at Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens, 
as Assistant Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. 

It was also 

VOTE D: To authorize the Assistant Treasurer of the 

Board of Trustees, G. E. Erickson, to approve 
expenditures for appropriations to the College 
at Fort Devens on behalf of the Board of Trustees, 
and in accordance with the provisions of Section 5> 
Chapter 75 » of the General Laws. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3 o'clock. 



Secretary 




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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



November 27, 1946 



Board of Trustees of 

Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens 



• l> r 



The following letter dated November 16 from Gunnar E. Erickson, 
Chief Fiscal Officer of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens to 
Joseph Yi. Bartlett, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, and resultant 
mail ballot are hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

The ballot was sent by Chairman Bartlett to members of the 
Executive Committee of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens and 
has been approved by each member of the Committee. 

November 16, 194-6 

Joseph 77. Bartlett, Esq. 
49 Federal Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Dear Mr. Bartlett: 

At the meeting of the Executive Committee of the Board of 
Trustees of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens held in your 
office on August 22nd, 1946, it was voted "To authorize Dr. Hodnett to 
enter into contract for feeding students at Devens with the understand- 
ing that the contract is to be approved by the Commission on Administra- 
tion and Finance. Dr. Hodnett has three bids none in excess of $10.50 
per man per week." The bids were let to Fitzpatrick Brothers at #9«95 
per week per student; subsequently they withdrew and Crotty Brothers took 
over at <?9»95 per week per student. 

When these bids were made the semester was presumed to be the 
basis for the billing to the students, as this is the basis which most 
colleges use. The students were notified that the board would be at the 
rate of $39*30 p^r month payable in advance. The concessionaire set up 
a ticket system where all meals eaten were punched, and it was because of 
this ticket punching that our complaints started. You are aware of the 
situation arising because we compelled the students to pay for all their 
meals whether they ate here or not. 

In view of this fact, and because we did not notify the stu- 
dents in advance that board was set on the semester basis, the problem 
has arisen as to who was to pay for meals during Thanksgiving, Christmas 
and Easter vacations. If the student were to pay for these meals it 
could mean either that (l) he buy the monthly ticket as he has in the 
past; or (2) he pay proportionately more for meals he does eat. If the 
concessionaire were to stand the cost of his labor during the vacation 
periods it would mean that he would operate at a loss, which could be re- 
covered only by increased costs to students or by cutting the quality 



36 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



and quantity of the food. 

It is our feeling that the concessionaire should not be 
asked to bear this burden, which he refused to do at a meeting held 
in my office yesterday, We do not want to increase the cost ox board 
to the student, and we know from past experience that they will balk 
on buying a month* s ticket when they will miss 14. days at Christmas. 
The only alternative that I can see is to take the cost of labor of 
the concessionaire out of the 50 cents per week per student set up in 
the contract to cover rental of premises. We have agreed to consult 
with the Crotty Brothers to use every means to keep this labor down to 
a minimum. There are sufficient amounts to cover this labor cost. 

I have talked with the Comptroller about this matter and he 
agrees with me that this is the only method that we could follow, as 
it is not possible to pay for the employees of the Crotty Brothers out 
of our budget. 

In the New York State set-up the State pays for the food, 
labor, overhead charges, and pays the concessionaire a commission for 
supervision. At Amherst the Boarding Hall pays no rent and a great 
amount of food is raised by the College farm and is transferred to the 
Boarding Hall at Comptroller 1 s prices which are much below market 
prices. Board there is at the rate of $7,70 per week. Most colleges 
require no payment from the dining halls for rent, heat, light and 
water and they carry their labor over vacation periods. 

In view of all these facts I wonder if we are not justified 
in following the procedure I mentioned above; that is, taking the cost 
of labor of the concessionaire during vacation periods out of the 50 
cents per week per student. May we have the approval of the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Trustees on this method of handling the 
problem? 

Very truly yours, 



GEE/mbc 



/s/ Gunnar E. Erickson 
Chief Fiscal Officer 



Hail Ballot 



i 



I 



I vote 



To approve adjustment of contract with Crotty Brothers for 
feeding students at Massachusetts State College at Fort 
Devens to permit taking of cost of labor of dining hall 
employees of concessionaire during all vacation periods 
during the academic year (said cost to be agreed upon in 
advance by both parties) out of the 50 cents per week 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



per student charge set up in the contract to cover 
rental of premises; the net amount only to be con- 
sidered as income. 



87 



Signed: Frank L« Boyden 

Leonard Canaichael 
John J. Desmond, Jr. 



Father William L. Kelehsr 
W. T. Cluverius 

Hugh P. Baker 




Secretary 



o 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



December 5, 1946 



Board of Trustees of 

Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens 



The following letter dated November 29, 194-6 from James 
W. Burke, Secretary, to members of the Board of Trustees of Massa- 
chusetts at Fort Devens and the resultant mail ballots (3) are here- 
by made part of the official records of the Board, 

November 29, 194-6 

To Members of the Board of Trustees of 

Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens 

■ 

Under date of August 22, 1946, your Executive Committee 
composed of Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman of the Board, Dr. Frank 
L. Boyden, Chairman of the Committee, Dr. Leonard Carmichael, 
Commissioner John J, Desmond, Father William L. Keleher, and 
Admiral TV. T. Cluverius voted 

■ 

"To authorize Dr. Hodnett to enter into contract 
for feeding students at Devens with the under- 
standing that the contract is to be approved by 
the Commission on Administration and Finance, 
Dr. Hodnett has three bids - none in excess of 
$10.50 per man per week." 

The Committee also voted 

"To authorize Dr. Hodnett to make arrangements for 
local concessions such as barber shop, shoe re- 
pair shop, and other services required on the 
campus at Devens." 

In accordance with these votes, contracts have been let 
as listed on the accompanying sheet. These contracts are now in 
the hands of the Attorney General for approval as to form after 
which they will go to the Governor and Council for approval. 

The Attorney General has requested that these contracts 
be approved by a majority of the Board of Trustees. With the 
approval of Chairman Bartlett, I herewith submit three ballots as 
listed on the next sheet. 



Sincerely, 

/s/ James W. Burke 
Secretary 



I 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



Mail . , Ballot s 

I vote 

To confirm the votes of the Executive Committee of Massachusetts State 
College at Fort Devens, August 22, 1946, in regard to authorizing 
Edward Hodnett to enter a contract for feeding students at Devens and 
contracts for local concessions on the campus. 

I vote 

To hereby specifically authorize and ratify the acts of said Edward 
Hodnett on behalf of the Trustees of Massachusetts State College at 
Fort Devens in entering into a contract for feeding students at Fort 
Devens dated September 24, 1946 with Crotty Brothers, Massachusetts Inc. 

I vote 

To hereby specifically authorize and ratify the acts of said Edward 
Hodnett on behalf of the Trustees of Massachusetts State College at 
Fort Devens in entering into the following listed concessionaire agree- 
ments and leases at Fort Devens: 



No . Conce ssion Explanation Conce s si onair e Date 

1. Dining Hall to furnish Crotty Bros. Mass. 9/24/46 

3 meals daily to all Inc. 

students 



Rental Charge 
.50 per week 
per student 



2. Snack Bar (Arabella 
Club) to furnish sand- 
wiches-pastry-milk- 
coffee-tea and soft 
drinks 



Crotty Bros. Mass. 9/23/46 
Inc. 



10$ of gross 
receipts 



3. Snack Bar (Charles 
Hall) services same 
as Arabella Club 



Crotty Bros. Mass. 9/23/46 
Inc. 



4. College Store to fur- Crotty Bros. Mass. 9/23/46 
nish cigarettes-cigars- Inc, 
tobacco-candy-magazines- 
toilet articles-text- 
books-supplies-j ewelry 
and novelties 



10% of gross 
receipts 



5% of gross 
receipts 



5. Barber Shop to furnish John Zona 
tonsorial service 

6. Tailor Shop to furnish Dominic Fusco 
clothing repair - 

cleaning and pressing 
service 



9/30/46 
9/30/46 



10$ of gross 
receipts 

10$ of gross 
receipts 



40 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



7. Cobbler Shop to 
furnish shoe re- 
pairs, shines and 
minor supplies 

8. Palace Steam 
Laundry to furnish 
laundry service for 
individuals and 
college dormitories 



Michael Klun 9/30/4-6 



10°/o of gross 



H. Chicknavoian 9/30/4.6 



receipts 



10% of gross 
receipts on in- 
dividual busi- 
ness 5% on college 
business 



All contracts subject to reviev/ after 60 days of operation, 
so that a flat rental basis may be established according to 
expenses involved. 



l 



Signed: Joseph ?v T . Bartlett 
Frank L. Boyden 
Alden 0. Brett 
Harry Dunlap Bro?«i 
Leonard Carmichael 
Frederick E. Cole 
John W. Deely 
John J. Desmond, Jr. 



C. W, Cole 
J. B. Conant 
Karl T. Compton 
William L. Keleher, S.J. 
Daniel L, Marsh 



Ernest Hoftyzer 
Lottie A. Leach 
Elisabeth L. McNamara 
Ralph F. Taber 
Richard Saltonstall 



James P. Baxter III 
Carl S. Ell 
W. T. Cluverius 
William J. Healy, S.J. 



I 




Secretary 



l 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



41 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOAKD OF TRUSTEES OF MASSACHUSETTS 
STATE COLLEGE AT FORT DEVENS 

December 13, 194-6, 6:00 P.M., Copley Plaza Hotel, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Carmichael, Fred 
Cole, Deely, Desmond, Hoftyzer, Hubbard, 
Mrs. Leach, Mrs. McNamara, Taber, Vrtiitmore, 
Compton, Marsh, Ell, Cluverius, Healy, 
President Baker, Secretary Burke, Dr. Hodnett, 
Mr. Erickson, Budget Commissioner Greenough 

At the request of the Chairman, Secretary Burke read call for 
the meeting and minutes of the last meeting of the Board. The minutes 
were approved as read. 

Chairman Bartlett presented Gunnar E. Erickson, Fiscal Officer Budget 
of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens, and requested that Mr. 
Erickson present the budget for the year beginning July 1, 194-7 and also 
present a deficiency budget for the balance of the present year. The 
Chairman said that at the time Devens was set up no one knew in advance 
how much it would cost for the first year. Because of unavoidable condi- 
tions, it was not possible to stay within the original budget of 
^1,300,000. Hence it will be necessary to go to the Legislature for addi- 
tional funds to complete the present year. 

In presenting the budget for the year beginning July 1, 194-7, 
Mr. Erickson said that it was based upon an expected attendance of 2300 
students in the fall of 1947. There are now 118 teaching positions at 
Devens and it is contemplated to provide for 47 more in the budget. 
Mr. Erickson then presented budget totaling $2,018,390 which includes 
3>lo2,150 for the operation of summer session in July and August of 1947 
and June of 1943. 



42 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

It is expected that the operation of Devens will return 
a total of $1,536,900 to the Commonwealth so that the net cost to 
the Commonwealth will be $4-81,490. 

Mr. Erickson announced that agreement has been reached 
with the Veterans Administration so that the College will receive 
$22 f> per student per semester. 

Mr. Erickson then presented a deficiency budget in the 
amount of $317, 655. He explained that the Legislature originally 
appropriated $1,300,000 for the operation of Fort Devens through 
June 30, 194V. This amount proved to be insufficient largely because 
of the nature of the buildings and grounds set apart by the Array for 
the use of the College. There is no central heating so that each 
building must be heated separately and it is necessary to employ 
firemen for three shifts during the day and night. Also the College 
counted on receiving certain supplies and equipment free or at a 
nominal rate and later it was found necessary to purchase these items. 
Chairman Bartlett asked Mr. Erickson if he had kept in constant con- 
tact with the Commission on Administration and Finance concerning 
expenditures above the amount 01 the budget. Mr. Erickson said that 
he had. Mr. Greenough confirmed this statement. 

Dr. Ell raised question as to the cost per student for the 
first year at Devens. Mr. Erickson said that costs in the first year 
were heavy but could not be compared with those of colleges which 
have been in operation for some time. In the first year it was 
necessary to spend large sums to prepare buildings for use as class- 
rooms and laboratories. It was also necessary to purchase laboratory 
equipment and other supplies which should be amortised over several 



I 



I 



I 



48 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

years and not considered as a one year cost only. He pointed out 

further that estimated revenues for the first two semesters of operation 

amount to §924, 003. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the deficiency budget of $317,655 for 
the year July 1, 194-6 through June 30, 1947 and 
the regular budget of $2,018,390 for the period 
July 1, 1947 through Juen 30, 1943. 

Commissioner Desmond raised question as to whether all students 
at Devens would attend the third semester offered in the summer. Dr. 
Hodnett replied that they would not, as many of the students find it 
necessary to earn in the summer so that they may carry on during the two 
winter semesters. He said that the teachers were hired for two 
semesters only and that they were not guaranteed salary for the third or 
summer semester except as their services may be required. 

President Baker reported that present plans call for the trans- 
fer of 84 students in Agriculture from Fort Devens to Amherst at the end 
of the first two semesters. It is also expected to transfer between 500 
and 600 Engineering students by February of 1948 when they will have com- 
pleted four semesters at Devens. Question was raised as to provisions 
for completion of the college program of those not in Agriculture or En- 
gineering. After lengthy discussion, it was agreed that it was not 
possible to make definite decision at this time as to how or where these 
men could complete their courses. It was pointed out that the Trustees 
could not agree definitely that they would remain at Devens as numbers 
might conceivably shrink for any one section of students to the point 
where it would be uneconomical for them to remain at Devens. 

Chairman Bartlett presented Vice President uodnett who re- 
viewed activities and operation of the College to date. Dr. Kodnett 
complimented the Commission on Administration and Finance for the 



44 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

splendid cooperation and constant help in meeting the problems of a 
new college. He spoke of the difficulties in the first year of 
operating with inadequate information as to the number of students who 
would attend, the cost of preparing buildings, and acquiring equipment. 
However, most of these problems have been solved and the Administration 
is now able to go ahead on a sounder basis. He said that the students 
are outstanding. It is no problem to induce them to study - in fact 
if anything, they study too much. The faculty is enthusiastic over the 
attitude of the students and as a result the quality of instruction 
and the personal relations between the faculty and the students are ex- 
cellent. In the mid-term examinations, the percentage of failures was 
only 3* A* He said the students are older, are self-confident and 
, cooperative. 

The faculty are giving their best to the students. They have 
taken on the assignment at Devens even though it is temporary because 
they are eager to perform that kind of service. The teachers have 
shared with the Administration in the problems of preparing the college 
for the students. However, the faculty is facing a serious problem of 
meeting the cost of living, particularly those in the lower grades. 
Many of the men are married, have children, and have had heavy moving 
expenses. Many of the faculty have just been released from the Armed 
Forces and have had the expense of purchasing clothing. Dr. Hodnett 
asked the Trustees to give consideration to the adjustment of salaries. 

He also raised question as to what the future holds for the 
students and staff at Fort Devens. &e said that he agreed with President 
Baker in the transfer of the Agriculture and Engineering students. He 



<_ v 



said that Devens can handle to eorapletiun the -Liberal Arts and Business 



45 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Administration students until 1951 when authorization for the operation 
of Devens expires. 

Budget Commissioner Greenough raised question as to whether 
the Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens en- 
dorses the request of the Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State 
College for the construction of an Engineering Building, Is such a 
building necessary for completion of the Engineering program for the men 
now registered at Devens? After discussion, it was 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State 
College at Fort Devens concurs in the request of 
the Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State 
College for an Engineering Building at Amherst 
as an essential in meeting the obligation of the 
Board to those students now registered in Engi- 
neering at Devens. The Board feels that such 
building at Amherst is the only practical means 
whereby the Engineering students at Devens can 
satisfactorily complete their program. 

In answer to question from Dr. Ell, President Baker said that 

the College does not now grant Engineering degrees. It offers a general 



course in Engineering leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



However, when a new building is added and course work strengthened, the 

Trustees have authorization to grant Engineering degrees. 

In response to Dr. Hodnett's request as to what the future 

holds for the students at Devens and whether they may be assured of the 

opportunity to complete their program, it was 

VOTE D: That it is the intent of the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens to make 
every effort to provide facilities so that students 
registered at Fort Devens may be allowed to complete 
their undergraduate studies either at Amherst or at 
Fort Devens or some other appropriate campus. 

It was also 






Engineering 
Building 



Curriculum 



Salaries - 
for faculty 



Federal Public 

Housing 

Authority 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

VOTED: To approve the attached curricula for the 
first two years at Fort Devens. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the Executive Committee to study 
faculty salaries at Fort Devens with a view 
to possible upward revision and to authorize 
the committee to add an item to the supple- 
mentary budget if the committee decides upon 
higher salary rates. 

It was 

VOTE D: To appoint Robert J, Davis, Jr. as Professor 

of Physical Education, effective January 1, 194-7 • 

It was 

VOTED : To approve contract with the Federal Public 

Housing Authority for the use of land, buildings, 
and equipment for housing purposes at Fort Devens 
by Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens and 
to authorize the Assistant Treasurer of the Board 
to sign said contract in the name of and for the 
Board of Trustees. 

It was 



I 



I 



Vocational 

Rehabilitation 

Training 



VOTED : To approve contract with the Veterans Administra- 
tion for the vocational rehabilitation training 
of veterans under Public Law 16 at Fort Devens by 
Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens and to 
authorize the Assistant Treasurer of the Board to 
sign said contract in the name of and for the 
Board of Trustees. 



Strand, Carl W 
bond for 



Mr. Erickson explained that Daniel Sullivan, Senior 

Accountant had resigned and that Carl W. Strand was appointed to 

succeed him. On Dr. Hodnett's recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To require bond in the amount of $10,000 covering 
Carl V». Strand, Senior Accountant at Massachusetts 
State College at Fort Devens to permit his signing 
checks as alternate to Mr. Erickson. 



It was 



I 



, 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

VOTED ; To authorize Carl W. Strand, Senior Accountant, 
Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens, to 
sign any and all checks required to be signed or 
endorsed in the name and behalf of Massachusetts 
State College at Fort Devens or the Board of 
Trustees of said Massachusetts State College at 
Fort Devens in order to deliver, withdraw from, 
and deposit to any accounts now existing or that 
exist in the future in the Union National Bank of 
Lowell, Such authorization is to become effective 
when Mr. Strand has been bonded. 

It was 

VOTED ; That the tuition rate for all students at Massa- 
chusetts State College at Fort Devens be set at 
§225 per semester. 

Dr. Hodnett reported that it has been difficult lor faculty 

families to receive medical attention located as they are one mile from 

the town of Ayer. He requested permission for college physicians to 

attend staff members and their families in cases of emergency. It was 

VOTED ; To empower the College Administration; namely, 
the President and the two Deans to authorize 
medical service to members of the college staff 
and their families by the college physicians in 
cases of emergency. 

Chairman Bartlett recalled that the Trustees of loassachusetts 

State College had voted to request the Chairman to appoint a special 

committee to study facilities of the College at Amherst with a view to 

determining what additional facilities would be required so that the 

College might take transfers from Fort Devens at the end of their 

sophomore year. I.Tr. Bartlett announced appointment of the following; 

Dr. James B. Conant, Chairman 

Dr. Leonard Carmichael, co-chairman 

Admiral Wat T. Cluverius 

Dr. Carl S. Ell 

Very Rev. William Healy, S.J. 

Dr. Ralph A. Van ^eter 



47 



Tuition 



Medical 
Service 



48 



By-Laws 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



It was 

VOTED ; To adopt the following By-Laws of the Board 

of Trustees of Massachusetts State College at 
Fort Devens. (See attached) 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:00 PJ^. 



I 




Chairman 



.Secretary 



I 



I 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



PROPOSED CURRICULA 
for 
MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FORT DEVENS 

18 December 194-6 



Herewith submitted are recommended curricula to extend the program 
already approved by the Trustees for Massachusetts State College at Fort 
Devens. Acceptance of this recommendation would establish the curricula 
for the first two years. 

a. Agriculture . Courses as listed in the Amherst catalogue 
for the first two semesters. Students are to transfer 
to Amherst for the balance of their specialized study. 

b. Business Administration. Courses as listed in the Amherst 
catalogue except as required for the development of the 
complete major established by the Board of Trustees, It 
is specifically requested that courses be authorized in 
the following subjects: 

Advanced Accounting (in preparation at Amherst) • 

TCorld Resources. 

Social Security. 

International Trade Relations. 

Social Psychology (in preparation at Amherst) • 

c. Engineering, . Except as noted below, courses to be as 
listed in the Amherst catalogue, for the first four 
semesters. Thereafter, students transfer to Amherst 
for the balance of their specialized study. 

The following exceptions are designed to meet the 
needs of especially qualified students whose records, 
previous training, and/or plans of study, make them 
quslified candidates for transfer to technical colleges: 

Mathematics 3 - Algebra - Trigonometry. Refresher. 

To carry 4 credit hours (4- class hours) instead 
of 3| as at present. 

Mathematics 17 - Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

To carry 4 credit hours (4 class hours) instead 
of 3» as at present. 



49 



hysics la - 2a - To carry 5 credit hours. 



Chemistry 1 - 2, a condensed refresher course of 
one semester, admitting students to Chemistry 25, 
Qualitative Analysis. 



50 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



d. Liberal Arts, Courses to be as listed in the Amherst 
catalogue, except that it is requested that the follow- 
ing new courses be authorized: 

Italian 1, 2 - Elementary 
Italian 3> A - Intermediate 

e * Science . Courses to be as listed in the Amherst 
catalogue, except advanced technical courses which 
can more advantageously be taught at Amherst. 



I 



I 



I 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



51 



BY-LAWS 



of the 



Board of Trustees 
of 
Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens 



Adopted 



1946 



Officers 

Article 1 . The officers of the Board of Trustees shall be President, 
Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer. The president of the Board shall be 
the Governor of the Commonwealth. The officers are charged with the 
duties and entitled to the rights and privileges defined by the laws of 
the Coramonwealth of Massachusetts, and also the duties, rights, and 
privileges which belong by general consent and parliamentary custom to 
their respective offices, so far as consistent with said laws, 

Meetings of the Board 

Article 2 , There shall be two stated meetings of the Trustees in each 
year. The first to be .fccnown as the annual meeting, at which officers 
shall be chosen and the annual report made, snail be neld during the 

i week of __, m , at 

or at such place as the Trustees at any previous meeting may determine. 
The second meeting shall be held at Massachusetts State College at 
Devens at the call of the Chairman. The day and hour of each of these 
meetings shall be fixed by the Chairman of the Board. 

Special meetings may be called at any time by the Chairman of 
the Board with the oral or written approval of a majority of the members 
of the Board or upon written request of the Governor or of any three 
Trustees or of the President of the College. Such request shall be made 
to the Secretary sho shall thereupon give written notice to each member 
of the Board at least seven days prior to the date set for the meeting, 
stating therein the object for which the meeting is called unless such 
notice shall be waived by all members of the Board. 

Quorum 

Article 3 > At all meetings of the 3oard nine members must be present to 
constitute a quorum. 

Trustee Committees 






Article L . 
members to 
meetings. 



(The Trustees shall elect) an Executive Committee of 

act for the Board of Trustees in intervals between Board 
The Chairman of the Boara of Trustees, the President 01 the 



College and the Vice-President of Massachusetts State College at Devens 



52 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

shall be members ex-officio of the Executive Committee. Special 
committees may be appointed or chosen from time to time as the 
Trustees at any meeting may deem expedient. Minutes of all 
committee meetings shall be sent by the Secretary to all members of 
the Board as soon as possible after each meeting. 

Meetings of Committees 

Article 5 « Committee meetings may be called by their respective chair- 
men or upon the request of two members made in writing to the Secretary. 
The Secretary shall issue the call not later than seven days prior to 
the date set for the meeting unless such notice shall be waived by all 
members of the committee. 



I 



Ap propriations 

Article 6. To provide for the financial support of the College by the 
Commonwealth, the Vice-President of Massachusetts State College at 
Devens snail prepare an annual budget in accordance with the require- 
ments of the State 3udget Commissioner. This budget shall be su omitted 
to the Board of Trustees for approval. The method of submission to the 
Trustees and their procedure in handling the budget snail be as de- 
termined by the Board. 

Appointments 

Article ?'. The Vice-President of Massachusetts State College at 
Fort Devens, the deans, the fiscal officer, neads of departments 
and professors shall be elected to X/Ueir respective positions by the 
Board of Trustees. Members of the professional staff below the 
grade of professor may be engaged by tne Vice-President of Massachu- 
setts State College at fort Devens within the limitations of the 
budget • 



I 



Other provisions of the by-laws of the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College that may be applicable to conditions at 
the College at Fort Devens shall be considered as by-laws of the 
Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens. 

Amendments 

Art icle 3. The By-Laws may be changed or amended and additional 
By-Laws may be adopted at any meeting of the Board of Trustees due 
notice having been given in call of meeting. 



I 



LWGS¥fiPt 



160 (a)-l 1-43. 13061 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

at Fort Devens 

EXCERPT OF 
MINUTES OF JOINT MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF 
MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MASSACHUSETTS STATE 
COLLEGE AT FORT DEVENS 

March 26, 1947, 6:30 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

President Van Meter suggested that the Trustees reaffirm 

their position concerning Massachusetts State College at Fort 

Devens so that the policy of the Board would be as clear as possibly 

to the students at Fort Devens, to newspapers, or other interested 

persons or organizations. Apparently there has been confusion at 

Fort Devens as a result of misunderstanding the attitude of the 

Trustees. He said that part of the confusion has resulted from 

poor liaison between Amherst and Devens and that this situation is 

being remedied, as the President and Vice President are planning 

to meet more frequently and deans of the two colleges are planning 

frequent meetings and will bring department heads together as 

necessary. He said that he and Dr. Hodnett were planning to 'work 

together in the matter of transfers. After discussion, the Board 

of Trustees of Massachusetts State College and the Executive 

Committee of the Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State College 

at Fort Devens 

VOTED : To reaffirm policy of the Board to keep the 

College at Fort Devens open as long as needed 
to insure a four-year college course for every 
qualified veteran. 

To reaffirm the policy of the Board to provide 
at the College at Fort Devens the freshman and 
sophomore years to all qualified veterans. 
Junior and senior years at Fort Devens will be 
approved only when it has been demonstrated 
that Massachusetts State College and/or other 
colleges cannot absorb all Devens students at 
the end of their sophomore year. 



52A 



Devens 



5 



52A-1 



XOEHDOCKX 



Business 

Administration 

curriculum 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

at Fort Devens 

To authorize the President and Secretary to 
confer with the Chairman of the Committee on 
Education of the General Court to inform him 
that if in the wisdom of the Legislature it is 
desirable to extend the period during which 
qualified veterans may be allowed to enter at 
Fort Devens, the Trustees are agreeable that 
the date for enrollment be extended to 
October 1, 1949. 

Dr. Van Meter read excerpt from letter from the Dean of 
Admissions at Boston University in which the Dean stated that stu- 
dents in good standing at Fort Devens at the end of their sophomore 
year may be accepted as transfers to Boston University with full 
credit for their first two years' work. 

Vice President Hodnett submitted a report on the Devens 

budget for the year beginning July 1, 194-7 as prepared by the 

Chief Fiscal Officer, report from Dean of the Faculty and report 

from Dean of Students (see attached), and the Board of Trustees of 

Massachusetts State College and the Executive Committee of the 

Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens 

VOTED : To accept Dr. Hodnett' s report and in- 
corporate it into the records of the Board. 

On the recommendation of Vice President Hodnett and 

President Van Meter, the Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State 

College and the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of 

Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens 

VOTED; To approve a Business Administration curri- 
culum for freshman and sophomore years as 
stated in the attached list. 

On the recommendation of Vice President Hodnett and 

President Van Meter, it was 



16©(a)-lM3. 13051 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

at Fort Devens 

VOXEL ; To approve terns of employment for members 
of the professional staff of the College at 
Devens as stated in the attached memorandum. 

On the recommendation of Vice President Hodnett, Presi- 
dent Van Meter, and Treasurer Hawley, the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College and the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens 

VOTED: To approve an official seal for Massachu- 
setts State College at Fort Devens which will 
be the present official seal with the addi- 
tional words "at Fort Devens" and to name the 
Assistant Treasurer of the Board of Trustees 
as custodian of the seal. 



Those present at this meeting include: 

Trustees Bartlett, Keleher, Cluverius, Desmond, 
Boyden, Hoftyzer, Taber, Frederick Cole, Hubbard, 
Whitmore, Saltonstall, Brett, Mrs. McNamara, 
Mrs. Leach, Actir.g President Van meter, Vice Presi- 
dent Hodnett, Chief Fiscal Officer Erickson, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 



52A-; 



Terms of 
Employment at 
Devens 



Seal of the 
College 



TRUSTEE 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 



I 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF 
TRUSTEES OF MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FORT DEVENS 

February 4-, 1947, 11; 00 A.M., Administration Building, 
Fort Devens, ?,!assachusetts 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESET: Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Carmichael, 
Desmond, Keleher, Cluverius and Dean 
Van Meter, Vice President Kodnett, Dean 
Stokes, Dean Williams, Fiscal Officer 
Srickson, Secretary Burke 

The following is the call for the meeting: 

January 21, 1947 

Executive Committee of the Board 
of Trustees of Massachusetts State 
College at Fort Devens 

At the request of the Chairman, a meeting of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Board of Trustees of Massachusetts 
State College at Fort Devens is hereby called to convene 
Tuesday, February 4, 1947, at 11:00 A.M. at Fort Devens in 
the Administration Building. 

The purpose of this meeting will be to consider and 
act upon problems which have arisen since the last meeting 
of the Full Board and transact such other business as may 
be presented. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ James W, Burke 
Secretary 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the minutes of the 
last previous meeting. 

Dr. Boyden suggested that the main purpose of the meeting 
should be to consider requests of the Devens faculty for salary in- 
creases. He said that a committee of the faculty had called upon him 
at Deerfield to present their case, that he was much impressed by the 
attitude of the men and their need for a more adequate salary standard 



Call 



Salary increases 
for Devens 
faculty 



54 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

■ 

The faculty committee was then Invited to meet with the 
Trustees. This committee -was composed of Messrs, Bacon, O'Shea, 
"oulton, Mulcareau, Kaplan. Professor Bacon, chairman of the committee, 

■ 
- 

said that the committee was elected by the faculty to present their 
request for salary increases as expressed in recent faculty meetings. 






Professor Bacon said that since 1940 there has been a 1&% 
rise in cost of living. Salaries are such that faculty members are un- 
able to meet living costs especially those in the lower grades. 
Savings have been used and in some cases their families are assisting 
them and in ether cases they are having to borrow. He said that other 
veteran colleges 5 namely, those in Connecticut and &ew ^ork, are pay- 
ing members of the teaching staff more than the salaries at the regular 
state colleges of those states because of the temporary niiture of the 
work. 

The committee proposed a $1200 increase in annual salary of 
Instructors and Assistant Professors and a $1000 increase in the annual 
salary of Professors and Associate Professors. These requests are 
based on estimated annual deficiencies of $1240 for Instructors and 
§1125 for Assistant Professors. 

The committee also requested a $600 bonus to cover additional 
expenses caused by setting up of new residences and increased cost of 
living. Expenses at Ayer are greater than anyone estimated. Further, 
the insecure tenure of the positions argues for greater income. Members 
of the committee pointed out that a majority of the teachers at Devens 
are veterans and have had the extra expense of buying clothing on 
leaving the service. 



I 



I 



55 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Commissioner Desmond suggested that the Trustees consider the 
request for salary increases not just en the basis of meeting living 
costs of teachers but on the basis of paying professional men fair and 
adequate compensation for their services. 

Chairman Bartlett called for questions from Trustees and also 
urged members of the faculty committee to speak fully. After members of 
the committee said that they had presented all the information which 
they desired to present, they retired from the room and the Trustees con 
tinued discussion of the request for salary increases. 

The committee agreed that the problem facing Instructors at 
Devens is typical of the plight of "white collar" workers generally. 
The feeling was expressed that it would be unfair to make salary increases 
at Devens without making similar increases for teachers at Amherst. 

Dr. Carmichael suggested that the Trustees explore the possi- 
bility of arranging sufficient pay for the summer session at Devens so 
that the annual salary of teachers would be increased. Dr. Hodnett said 
that about 25% of the students expect to take the summer session. The 
summer session is 12 weeks long and it is his present thought to employ 
one group of teachers for the first 6 weeks and another group for the 
second 6 weeks. On this basis 25% of the teachers would be employe* in 
each of the 6 weeks so that a total of 50% of the teachers would receive 
6 weeks employment. It has been agreed with the Commission on Ad- 
ministration and Finance that an individual teaching 6 weeks of the 
summer session will receive one-fourth of his annual salary. 

Dr. Carmichael suggested that arrangement might be made with 
the Commission on Administration and Finance to guarantee 6 weeks summer 



employment to all members of the staff. He said it could be argued that 



56 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

the college has a prior commitment to its teachers to provide summer 
work. Dr. Hodnett pointed out that because of the nature of the 
Devens College, members of the teaching staff are carrying on many 
additional duties ether than classroom instruction. They are assist- 
ing the Administration, are working in the Library, and elsewhere. 
Guch extra work might also aid in justifying the guarantee of summer 
pay. It was 

VOTED: To authorize Dr. Hodnett to work out with the 
Commission on Administration & Finance a plan 
whereby all members of the Devens teaching staff 
could be guaranteed 6 weeks work in the summer 
at one-fourth of the annual salary. 

Dean Williams proposed that beginning September 1, 1947, In- 
structors be granted three step-rate increases; that Assistant Professors 
be granted two step-rate increases; and that Associate Professors and 
Professors one step. 

The committee took no action on the proposal at that time. 
Chairman Bartlett requested Dr. Kodnett to put this proposal or any 
other proposal that he favored in writing so that it might be con- 
sidered by the Board of Trustees of Massachusetts State College at its 
annual meeting on Thursday, February 6. 

On the recommendation of Dr. Hodnett, it was 

VOTED : To approve appointment of Dr. Herbert C. Coar 
as Professor of Biology. 

On the recommendation of Dr. Kodnett, it was 

Naval V OTED : To approve contract with the Bureau of Naval Personnel 

Aviation College for the payment of fees of students in the Naval Avia- 

program - fees tion College program who are otherwise qualified for 

for students admission to Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens 

and to authorise the Assistant Treasurer of the Board 
to sign said contract in the name of and for the 
Board of Trustees provided that the contract is 
approved by President Baker. 



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5Y 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Dr. ^odnett reported that the School Committee at Ayer has re- 
fused to accept sons and daughters of those on the campus at Devens as 
pupils in the Ayer public schools unless fees are paid varying from $68 
to $91 per year. Attorney General Barnes has checked on authority of the 
school officials to make this ruling and apparently the ruling is valid. 
As this is an additional expense not contemplated by those at Devens, 
Dr. Hodnett requested that the State pay the tuition. He has talked 
the matter 7d.th Mr. Buckley and Mr. Greenough and believes that they 
approve. After discussion, it was 



VOTED : To approve payment of tuition fees for attendance 
at the Ayer public schools of children living at 
Massachusetts State College at Fort Devens. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:15 ?.**• 



Children at 

Devens - 
tuition fees 




ecretary 



■70 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 






MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AT FORT DEVENS 

May 23, 194-7, 1:15 p .^., barker House, Boston 

Trustee Bartlett presiding 



I 



Terms of 
Employment 



Devens 
Budget 



PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, ^eleher, Hubbard, 
Desmond, Carmichael, Mrs. McNaiaara, 
President Baker, Vice President Hodnett, 
Dean ^achmer, Chief Fiscal Officer 
Erickson, Secretary Burke 

President Baker and Vice ^resident Hodnett introduced for con- 
sideration of the Trustees a number of items requiring Trustee action 
and after explanation and discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve revised form of terms of employment 
for members of the professional staff of the 
University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 
( see attached) «, 

To approve supplemental budget of $9,54-0 for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 194-7 for the 
following two items: 

a. 1,j ew position of Assistant Treasurer $3,540. 

b. Insurance on F.W.A. buildings and quarter- 
master equipment £6,000. 

To approve request of the Budget Commissioner for 
change in wording of the appropriation setting up 
the budget item 3513-23 to include the following 
words: "and including certain tuition payments to 
the town of -^yer, if necessary." 

To approve request of the Budget Commissioner for 
change in wording of the appropriation setting up 
budget item 3^13-23 which now reads as follows: 
"provided that any revenue resulting from the 
activities herein authorized shall be credited to 
the Veterans' Services Fund," so that the athletic 
and activities fees and that portion of the cost 
of student supplies included in the $250 per stu- 
dent per semester received from the Veterans Ad- 
ministration might be set up as revolving funds and 
used to pay athletic and activities costs, except 
salaries, and student supply costs up to amounts 
received from the Veterans Administration. 



I 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Vice President Hodnett said that there is a good chance that the 
Federal Works Sgency would be willing to shift its appropriation for re- 
construction of Boarding Hall from the building which burned to the base- 
ment of Worcester Hall. However, it would be necessary for the State to 
appropriate -$15,000 for the purchase of equipment. After discussion, it 



was 



VOTED ; To recommend to the Commission on Administration and 
Finance the transfer of the Federal Works Agency 
Project from Building T-1875 to the Building P-113 
and that, if necessary, an appropriation in the 
amount of #15,000 for the purchase of equipment be 
included in the supplementary budget request for the 
fiscal year 194-3. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve medical practice by the resident physicians 
outside of their regular hours of duty at the Univer- 
sity unaer rules and regulations adopted by the Vice 
^resident. 



5 






It was 

VOTED : T approve the appointments of the following men as 
full professors, effective September 1, 194-7: 

Leonard Arnaud Spanish 

Arthur G. Hldreth Physics 

Ralph u . Lounsbury History 

Alvan S. Ryan English 

The meeting was adjourned at 2 $30 P.M. 




Secretary 



60 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



AT FORT DEVENS 



MEMORANDUM OF PROFESSIONAL APPOINTMENT 



to 



INSTRUCTION STAFF 



I 



(Date) 



To: 

Upon recommendation of the Committee on Appointments, I 

hereby appoint you to the position of 

at a salary of* 



per_ 



effective on 



,. This appointment is to become 
, and will terminate on 



I 



In accepting this appointment it will be understood that 
you agree to the Terms of Employment as stated on the reverse 
side. 

The enclosed form should be completed and returned at 
once to indicate your acceptance of this appointment. 



Edward Hodnett 
Vice President 



*See Par. f>, Terms of Employment 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



AT FORT DEVENS 



:erms of employment 



1. An appointment is authoritative only when confirmed in writing by 
the Vice President in charge of the University of Massachusetts at Fort 
Devens and upon receipt, in the office of the Vice President, of the 
letter of acceptance. 

2. An appointment shall be in accordance with the terms specified in 
the letter of confirmation. 



3. All appointments are temporary. However, appointments are subject to 
renewal so long as the University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens exists. 

4. Except as noted in paragraph 6, below, faculty appointments are for 
one academic year (l September to 31 August) • In addition to their in- 
structional assignments of the regular Fall and Winter Semesters, 
faculty members are subject to call for other normal academic duties at 
any time during the academic year at the discretion of the Vice President 
without additional pay. 



5. The salary of faculty appointees shall be paid in twelve monthly in- 
stallments during the academic year at the rate of one-twelfth of the 
annual salary per month. Payments shall be made on the first clay of 
each month for the preceding month. 

6. Special appointments are those applicable to Summer Semester, part- 
time or limited-term, or part-time limitea-term appointees. Salary in 
such cases shall be paid at the rate specified in this memorandum and 
shall be paid on the first day of each month for the preceding month. 



7. Certain appointments (as in the case of Deans, Heads of Divisions, 
the Supervisor of Records, the Librarian, and other) are made on the 
basis of service performed during the twelve months of the academic year. 
Salary in such cases shall be paid in twelve monthly installments on the 
first day of each month for the preceding month. 

3. In accordance with section 31, of Chapter 29, of the General Laws, 
advances on account of salaries may be made under such regulations as the 
State Treasurer may prescribe, not exceeding the proportion of salary 
then due, nor oftener than once in seven days, nor after the twenty- 
fifth day of the month. 



9. The appointee should report at the Vice President 1 s Office and to 
the Dean of the Faculty when first reporting for duty. At this time the 
^ice President will sign the official notification to the Treasurer 
authorizing the name to be placed upon the salary roll. The date at 
which salary begins will coincide with the date of report to the ^ice 
President unless otherwise specified in the appointing memorandum. 



6: 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



*fWB| 



I 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



UNIVERSITY IF 1IASSACHUSETTS 



63 



Amherst, Mas ?etts 



August 6, 194-7 



Board of Trustees of 



University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 

The following letter from Secretary Burke to the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
at Fort Devens dated July 23, 194.7 and the resultant mail ballot are 
hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 

July 23, 194-7 

To Executive Committee 

Board of Trustees 

University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 

The College at Fort Devens has been using office and mainte- 
nance equipment ovned by the Army 3 b the understanding that a lease for 
its use would be executed in due time. It vas expected that a 10 per 
cent rental vould be charged. Hovever, because of the fine efforts of 
Commissioner Buckley and Dr. Hodnett, the proposed rental has been 
reduced to 2| per cent. 

There will be a meeting soon of college authorities and repre- 
sentatives of the Var Department to sign lease covering the past year. 
At this meeting Dr. Hodnett will need authority to sign the lease for the 
Board. To avoid calling a special meeting of the Executive Committee, 
Chairman Bartlett has suggested that members might be willing to act by 
mail ballot. 

Would you please indicate on the attached ballot whether you 
approve authorizing such lease to be executed by Dr. Hodnett? For your 
further information, the ballot is attached. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ James ¥. Burke 
Secretary 



u 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



I 



Mail Ballot 



July 23, 1947 



Executive Committee, Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 

I vote to authorize Dr. Edward Hodnett, Vice President of the 
University of Massachusetts, to sign lease from the War Department for 
personal property (largely office and maintenance equipment) now 



being used by 



he College at Fort Devens. 



¥. T. Cluverius, Joseph ¥. Bartlett, William L. Keleher, 
John J. Desmond, Jr., Frank L. Boyden, Leonard Carmichael, John M. 
Deely. 



James W. Burke 
Secretary 



I 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

xMINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES, UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AT FORT DEVENS 

September 9, 194-7, 11:00 A.M., Parker House, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Cluverius, Desmond, Keleher, 
President Van Meter, Vice President Hodnett, 
Dean Williams, Dean Stokes, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke 

Upon the recommendation of Vice President Hodnett and President 

Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To approve reclassification of the position of 
Librarian at Fort Devens to the pay range of 
Associate Professor ($4,380 to $5>100). 



65 



Librarian 



sick leave 



Dr. Hodnett explained that tne absence of Mr. Erickson, vho is G. E. Erickson 
on sick leave, is making most difficult the fiscal operations at Fort 
Devens. He said that Mr. Erickson has had ten years of service at the 
college at Amherst and was granted leave of absence from Amherst until 
June 30, 19-48 so that he could be Chief Fiscal Officer at Fort Devens. 
He has been out ill since June and there is no indication as to when or 
whether he will return. He is entitled to further sick leave with pay. 
After discussion, it was 



VOTED: To fill Mr. Erickson 1 s position as Chief Fiscal 

Officer through the appointment of Sumner K. Wiley, 
Regional Director of the Federal Public Housing 
Authority. 

If Mr. Wiley 1 s services cannot be obtained, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Chairman Bartlett and Dr. VanMeter to 
act with Dr. Hodnett in the selection of another 
man to fill this post. 

Dr. Hodnett stated that five temporary positions set up at 

Devens last year do not have provision for step-rate increases since the 

positions are not recognized in the State classification system. As a 



Step-rate 
increases for 
5 temporary 
positions 



Budget 



Room Rent 



Rent Refund 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

result, all others at Devens, except these five men, have received 
step-rate increases at the end of their first year of service. It 

was 

VOTE D: To approve the principle of step-rate increases 

for these five positions either by requesting the 
personnel office to fix ranges of pay to provide 
increases or by reallocating the men to recognized 
positions in the State classification system. The 
positions are: 

Administrative Assistant, present encumbent 
Donald Shea, $4260. 

Assistant to Property Procurement Officer, 
present encumbent Richard Silber, $2400. 

Superintendent of Buildings & Grounds, present 
encumbent, George "Whalen, $3600. 

Plumbers Helpers, present encumbents Richard 
Valdwin and Joseph Brostek, $1860. 

The committee devoted most of the meeting to consideration 

of the budget proposed by Dr. Hodnett and approved by Treasurer 

Hawley and President Van Meter for the operation of the Devens branch 

for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 194-3. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To approve a budget of $1,4.71,4-65 for the 
University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 
for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 194-3. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize a room rent charge of $35«00 per 
semester for each student. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize refunds of room rent paid in advance: 

(a) to a student withdrawing from college, the refund 
to be the total amount if the student withdraws with- 
in the first seven days of college, half the total 
amount if the student withdraws on or before mid- 
semester, but nothing in case of withdrawal after mid- 
semester; (b) on a pro rata basis to a student 
authorized to relinquish dormitory accommodations 
previously assigned. 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



It was 

VOTED ; To authorise the Vice President to impose a 

quarantine in case of contagious disease on the 
advice of the college physician, in conformity 
with the practices of surrounding communities and 
the regulations of the State Department of Health. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve the appointment of Dr. Ralph Lounsbury as 
Professor of History and Head of the Division of 
Social Studies effective September 1, 194-7. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve appointment of Dr. Henry A. i^agno as 
Senior Physician with the rank of Professor 
effective July 1, 194-7. 

It was 

VOTED : To reaffirm approval of the position of Head of the 
Division of Activities and to approve appointment of 
John A. Jessup as Head of the Division when the posi- 
tion is re-established. 

Dr. Hodnett explained that the Administration at Devens has 

been in consultation with the student body concerning arrangements for 

meal service during the college year about to open. It is the general 

desire of the students that the college provide for five-day meal 

tickets as well as seven-day meal tickets. Crotty Brothers have been 

consulted and have offered rates for each of the two types of tickets. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the revised contract with Crotty Brothers, 

food concessionaire, for the period beginning September 
15, 19-47. 

It was further 

VOTED: Not to include utility rate charges for the boarding 

hall in the price of meal tickets so that these charges 
will not be borne by the students, provided this 
arrangement meets with the approval of the Commission 
on Administration and Finance; and to approve a rate 
for five-day meal tickets of $9.50 and for seven-day 
meal tickets of $13.50. 



67 



Quarantine in 
case of con- 
tagious 
diseases 



Head of 
Division of 
Social Studies 



Senior 
Physician 



Head of 
Division of 
Activities 



H 



eals 



68 



CO 

"X3 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 P«M, 



***** 



I 




^James W. Burke 
Secretary of the University 



i 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Amherst, Mass. 



November 21, 19 LI 



Board of Trustees of the 

University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 



The following letter of November \L from Secretary Burke to the 
Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the university of 
Massachusetts at Fort Devens and e resultant mail ballots are hereby 



rt of the official records of the Board. 



November \L, 1947 



To the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 

I believe you know that Mr. Gunnar E. Erickson, Chief Fiscal 
Officer at Fort Devens, is currently on leave of absence because of 
he ; The administration there has been unable to carry on without 
filling this position and have recently obtained the services of 
Mr. Edward W, in. 

In order that Mr. Mahan may sign schedules, checks, payrolls, 
etc., it is necessary - . t he be appointed Assistant Treasurer of the 
Board of Trustees nd specifically authorized to approve expenditures 
from appropriations. 

The Executive Committee approved similar actions concerning 
. Erickson. Would you, therefore, be willing to vote by mail on 
these items as stated bel: 



69 



Sincerely, 

/s/ James V. Burke 
Secretary of the University 



70 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Mail Ballot 

I vote to appoint Mr. Edward ¥. Mahan, Chief Fiscal Officer 
for the University at Devens, as Assistant Treasurer of the Board 
of Trustees. 



I 



I vote to authorize the Assistant Treasurer of the Board of 
Trustees, Edvard W. Mahan, to approve expenditures from appropria- 
tions to the University at Fort Devens on behalf of the Board of 
Trustees and in accordance vith the provisions of Section 5> 
Chapter 75 of the General Lavs. 



J. W. Bartlett 
W. T. Cluverius 
¥. L. Keleher 



John J. Desmona 
Leonard Carmichael 
Frank L. Boyden 



R. A. Van Meter 



James ¥. Burke 
Secretary of the University 



I 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Minutes of Meeting of Board of Trustees of the University of 

Massachusetts at Fort Devens 

December 30, 1947, 6:30 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, Brown, Carmichael, 
Cole, Deely, Desmond, Hoftyzer, Hubbard, Leach, 
McNamara, Taber, Whitmore, Compton, Ell, Marsh, 
Acting Presicent Van Meter, Vice President Hodnett, 
Dean Machraer, Professor Marston, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with reading 
of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Dr. Van Meter said that the Trustees should feel proud of the fact- 
that Devens has met the need for which it was established. All qualified 
Massachusetts veterans have had the opportunity to enter college. The en- 
rollment at Devens is now at its peak. The problem of organization is done. 
From now on this problem is changing to one of gradual dissolving of the 
temporary branch of the University and in this the University administration 
will need the constant help of the Board of Trustees. 

Dr. Hodnett gave a progress report on Devens. He mentioned, as 
evidence that Devens has about reached the final stages in the development 
of its facilities, that the Library has expanded, long awaited lounge furni- 
ture and classroom arm chairs have arrived, a psychological testing 
laboratory has been equipped, and the nev dining hall and kitchen in 
Worcester Hall will be ready in about a week. 

Dr. Hodnett announced that, in answer to the Governor's request for 
a ten per cent saving in all State departments this year, he had reported an 
estimate of a gross saving of $293,694-23 and a net saving of $206,242.23, 
almost precisely ten per cent of the current appropriation. From the gross 
saving of fourteen per cent, he has had to subtract salary increases and in- 



CO 

WHHMi 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS O* 



creases in personnel made mandatory by the forty-hour law, both of which 
were voted by the General Court without an appropriation for Devens. 
Dr. Hodnett pointed out that an amount of $129,139.28 in the gross saving 
represents over-all economies quite separate from savings in faculty 
positions cancelled because of an enrollment lower than that estimated. 
The predicted registration for Devens in February is 181 new 
freshmen and 1331 old students — total 1562. The distribution is ex- 

■ 

pected to be Agriculture 31; Horticulture 51; Engineering 530; Liberal 
Arts: (a) Business Administration 290, (b) Others 235, Total 575; Science 
293; Physical Education 32. The enrollment at Devens for September, 194-3, 
at present is estimated at 1000. 

In reporting on the transfer situation, Dr. Hodnett gave as the 
latest estimate of Professor Pericins, head of the Division of Records 
and Guidance: February — 260 students to the University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, and 50 to other institutions, (total 310); September 19^3 about 
600 to Amherst and about 130 to other institutions (total 730). 

Replies to a questionnaire sent to former Devens students now 
registered at other institutions indicate that the instruction received 
at Devens was satisfactory. Former students particularly praised the 
friendliness and helpfulness of the Devens faculty. On the basis of 
national standings, it appears that the performance of 1334- Devens stu- 
dents on the American Council on Education Psychological Examination 
(194-6 college edition) places Devens about twentieth from the top in ,the 
total grouping of 354- colleges. Dr. Hodnett suggested that this ex- 
cellent showing was a tribute to the care with which the Devens students 
were selected by Dean Machmer and Mr. Lanphear at Amherst and an 
assurance that academic standards were in no way being jeopardized. 



I 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Dr. Hodnett also reported briefly on the efforts being made to 
make contacts and arrangements for . future placement of the Devens 
faculty. The records of all faculty and administrative staff men are 
available. In an effort to keep a satisfactory faculty at Devens until 
it closes, it is hoped to earmark as many as possible of the faculty, who 
are not leaving at the end of this academic year, for placement at the 
end of the academic year 194-3-4-9, as well as those who are leaving at 
the end of this academic year. 

Dr. Hoanett said that the legality of mail ballots has been 
questioned by the Attorney General's Office. He requested confirming 



vote of the Board on an action taken by mail ballot by the Executive 

Committee on November 27, 194-7, and it vas 

VOTED : To approve adjustment of contract with Crotty 
Brothers for feeding stuaents at Massachusetts 
State College at Fort Devens to permit taking 
of cost of labor od dining hall employees of 
concessionaire during all vacation periods during 
the academic year (said cost to be agreed upon in 
advance by both parties) out of the $0 cents per 
weeic per student charge set up in the contract 
to cover rental of premises; the net amount only 
to be considered as income. 



It was 

VOTED: To authorize Chairman Bartlett, Dr. Van Meter, 

and Dr. Hodnett to appoint a new Senior Physician 
to succeed Dr. Henry A. Magno. 

It was 



VOTED : To authorize the Vice President to make arrange- 
ments for local concessions such as barber shop, 
shoe repair shop, and other services required on 
the campus at Devens. Concessions are to be let 
after consultation with the Treasurer of the 
University. 



Secretary Burke spoke on the personnel outlook as it affects 
the ability of the University at Amherst to handle transfers from Devens. ; 



ratio is 12-13 to 1. 

The Secretary complimented Dr. Hodnett and his associates 

at Devens for bringing together a teaching staff on short notice and 

for holding the staff together despite the temporary nature of the 

teaching positions. He spoke also of the cooperative efforts of a 

committee of the Devens faculty and a committee of the faculty of the 

University at Amherst who cooperated with the Trustees in obtaining 

higher salaries for teachers. The new salaries which went into 

effect July 1, 1947 are as follows compared with salaries as of 

June 30. 

Old New 

Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum 

Instructor, Research 2,220 2,700 2,760 3,300 
Assistant 

Assistant Professor, 2,820 3,900 3,360 4-, 320 
Assistant Extension Pro- 
fessor, Assistant Research 
Professor 

Associate Professor 3,960 4,200 4,380 5,100 

Professor, Research Pro- 4,080 4,800 5,100 6,300 
fessor, Extension Pro- 
fessor 

Head of Department 4,380 5,100 5,400 6,600 

Secretary Burke said that the Administration at Amherst 
is cooperating with Dr. Hodnett and his associates in giving first 
preference to men now teaching at Devens in filling vacancies at 
Amherst. 



so 






MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS CU 

Before the war, the University had 135 teachers of the grade of 

; 

Instructor and up. There are now 210 teachers at Amherst and this 
winter's budget calls for an additional 50. The teacher-student 



75 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Dean Machmer reported on enrollment, transfers, and academic 
progress. (See attached report). He said that the building program at 
Amherst has been slower than anticipated and urged the cooperation of 
presidents of other Massachusetts colleges in taking as many transfers 
from Devens as possible. 

Professor Marston reported on the Engineering program at 
Amherst . (See attached report) . Dr. Comoton asked whether the Univer- 
sity has recuested inspection of its Engineering program and facilities 
by the accrediting authorities. Professor Marston said no - that it was 
not planned to request inspection for accrediting until the new 
laboratory is completed. 

Treasurer Hawley spoke on progress of the building program at 
the University. He said that delays have been inevitable, that the 
Trustees and the university administration have done everything possible 
to keep the new buildings moving but that shortages of materials, 
shortage of skilled labor, and other difficulties have prevented rapid 
progress. None the less, the University will be ready in so far as 
buildings are concerned to take the Devens transfers as scheduled pro- 
vided the Legislature continues its support this winter. (See attached 
report) . 

Chairman Bartlett said that the Trustees have begun well the 
responsibility of providing for the education of Massachusetts veterans 
by giving the first two years of work at Devens and by arranging for 



transfers to Amherst and other colleges for the junior and senior years. 



He called for comments from the presidents of Massachusetts colleges 
represented on the enlarged Board. On motion from Dr. Marsh which was 
auly seconded, it was unanimously 



76 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS £L 



VOTED ; To reaffirm the policy of the Board to provide 
at the Fort Devens branch of the University of 
Massachusetts freshman and sophomore courses for 
all qualified veterans who apply until the 
number of students there dwindles to the point 
where they may be absorbed at other colleges in 



the Commonwealth; 






To reaffirm the policy of providing for transfer 
to the University of Massachusetts and/or other 
colleges at the end of the sophomore year in the 
belief that veterans should be allowed to persue 
their junior and senior years of specialized study 
at long established colleges of recognized standing. 






Dr. Marsh daid that he was sure he spoke for other members of 
the Board in saying that the evening's program had been the most en- 
lightening, that he was encouraged by the job that is being done and 
by the good prospects for completing the task of the Board in 
creditable manner. He urged that the Trustees support President 
Van Meter in requesting help from the Legislature in developing the 
University at Amherst for the task that still lies ahead. 

Dr. Compton said that he would be glad to appear before the 
Legislature in favor of the Engineering Building at Amherst. He said 
that Massachusetts needs to develop Engineering at its University. 

On motion of Commissioner Desmond and duly seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts at Fort Devens considers the need 
for an Engineering Building on the campus at 
Amherst as critical for the completion of the 
educational program of Engineering students now 
registered at Amherst and at Fort Devens and 
recommends that the Legislature appropriate 
funds for this building as requested in the 
University budget. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:10 P.M. 



jChairman 
Secretary 




> 



I 



Report by William L. Machmer, Dean, University of Massachusetts 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Devens Report 

•THE REASON FOR THE FOUNDING OF DEVENS" 

The conditions i 

1. Veterans of the Commonwealth who could not be admitted to 
established colleges because they were full. 

2. Veterans qualified to profit by a college experience on the 
basis of educational standards in effect at the University. 

3. To complete curricula of the first two years during which 
time the State was to provide adequate facilities at Amherst 
to enable the University there to accept such recommended 
students who could not transfer elsewhere in order to com- 
plete their course and qualify for a degree. 

4. There was to be an accelerated program. 

The Admission Problem: 

Selecting veterans presented new and difficult problems. In all cases 
their secondary school work had been completed from two to four years 
earlier. Many had programs in general or commercial courses, never intend- 
ing to go to college. Others had scholastic records far too low to warrant 
college admission. They reflected the abnormal conditions of the time when 
every able bodied youth was destined to enter some foim of Military Service. 

The number of names given us was 3*000. Of this number, 2,000 finally 
applied for September admission. Of this number 915 were accepted on the 
strength of their secondary school record. 1,250 applied for the privilege 
of taking entrance examinations. These were given in two subjects only, 
Algebra and English at two centers. An aptitude test was also required. 
Of these 546 qualified. 

The total accepted on certificate and by examination was 1,461 of whom 
1,312 registered. 

In January 179 + 306 * 485 were accepted and 398 registered. In June 
71 * 116 =• 187 were accepted and 135 registered; and in September 215 4 270 * 
485 were accepted and 475 registered. The total registered to date is 2,320. 

In view of the placement requirements for majors in Agriculture and the 
lack of adequate facilities for specialized courses in Agriculture and Horti- 
culture, and the fact that all such students would eventually have to transfer 
to Amherst, it was decided to move agricultural students to Amherst at the end 
of one year. 132 registered at Amherst this fall, which brought the total 
enrollment at Amherst to 1,787 degree students. 

The total enrollment reported at Devens this September was 1,764* These 
were distributed among the different majors as follows 



Report by Dean Machmer continued 



-2- 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
AT FORT DEVENS 



October 10, 1947 



I 



1 



DISTRIBUTION BY MAJORS 










MAJORS 




SEMESTERS COMPLETED 




& 


1 


& 


2 


mm 


AGRICULTUREi 












Animal Husbandry 


15 


2 






17 


Farm Crops Management 


3 








3 


Dairy 


2 








2 


Foul try 


2 


1 






3 


General 


1 


5 


4 




10 


Vet. Science 




1 






1 


Agronomic 




JL 


—Hi 




a 


Totals 


23 


10 


4 


"o 


37 


HORTICULTURE: 












forestry 


17 


7 


3 


• 


27 


Landscape Architecture 


3 




1 




4 


Wildlife Management 


5 


1 






6 


Floriculture 


2 








2 


Food Technology 


1 


3 






4 


Olericulture 


1 






tg^ffiy 


■A 


Totals 


29 


n 


4 





44 


ENGINEERING: 












Agricultural 


1 




1 


' 


2 


Chemical 


29 


4 


20 


10 


63 


Civil 


46 


li 


45 


25 


127 


Electrical 


57 


23 


85 


43 


214 


Mechanical 


56 


19 


94 


37 


206 


Li#it Building 


5 






1 


6 


Undecided 


12 


2 


5 


1 


20 


General 


5 


3 


6 


2 


16 


Industrial 


2 




5 


4 


11 


Aeronautical 


1 




4 


1 


6 


Architectural 


1 


1 


3 


1 


6 


Metallurgy 






JL 




Sf 


Totals 


215 


68 


273 


125 


681 


LIHERAi, ARTS, 












Business Administration 


62 


35 


165 


59 


321 



>rt by Dean Machmer continued 



-3- 



MAJOBS 




SEMESTERS COMPLETED 




-ft 


I 


1 


1 


TOTALS 


LIBERAL AKTS (continued): 












Undecided 


17 


11 


33 




61 


Economics 


12 


6 


18 


10 


46 


English 


8 


7 


50 


19 


94 


History 


6 


4 


20 


8 


38 


Sociology 


3 


1 


1 


4 


9 


Psychology 


2 




7 


10 


19 


Political Science 


6 


1 


3 




10 


Literature 


1 


1 






2 


Education 


3 


1 


4 




8 


Pre Law 


1 




4 




5 


Government 




1 


3 


6 


10 


Languages 




3 


5 




8 


French 


1 




3 


3 


7 


German 




1 


1 




2 


Spanish 


1 


1 


1 


2 


5 


Fine Arte 


1 








a 


Totals 


63 


w 


1^3 


62 


325 


SCIENCEi 












Pre Medical 


29 


9 


48 


20 


106 


Pre Dental 


13 


4 


30 


5 


52 


Pre Veterinary 


7 


2 


U 


1 


24 


Bacteriology 


3 


2 


3 


1 


9 


Botany 


1 


2 


3 




6 


Chemistry 


17 


7 


28 


13 


55 


Mathematics 


2 


5 


16 


£ 


27 


Physics 


7 


3 


7 


9 


26 


Geology 




1 






1 


Entomology 




1 






1 


Zoology 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


Undecided 


2 


2 


2 




6 


Optometry 


| 3r 


1 






=1 


Totals 


83 


40 


US 


55 


326 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 


12 


A 


11 


2 


29 






206 


768 


303 


1,764 





I 









[ 



Report by Dean Machaer continued -4- 
Curriculum 

The curricula and courses offered at Devene were essentially the same 
as those available at Amherst* Several additional courses in English and Chemistry, 
Mathematics and Music were approved to make It possible to arrange a more 
satisfactory curriculum for students who entered with some advanced credit, 
or who wished to transfer to a dental or business administration schools 

To effect the transfer of students more readily, and to help in making 
out satisfactory schedules, our department heads went to Devens and 
registered each prospective transfer individually during the last four weeks* 

Certain first semester courses will have to be given at Amherst this 
coming semester, and in certain courses, extra sections must be provided* 

Classrooms and laboratories will be adequate for the transfer® who are 
due to arrive at the beginning of the second semester (Feb* 1948). 

But our building program is lagging behind to such an extent that we 
see major difficulties in September 1948 when 690 students are ready to leave 
Devens* But the problem can be handled (l) Some of these will decide to drop 
out, (2) a considerable number should be able to transfer to some other New 
England College, especially to those whose Presidents are members of this 
augmented Board of Trustees* The greatest relief will come if you accept a 
married veteran. 

Our limiting factors are ! ousing and feeding* 

Recapitulation - Fort Devens Admissions Figure 

No* accepted No* accepted No* who No* actually 
without exam s by exams took exams registered 
Oct. 915 546 1250 1312 

Feb. 1947 179 306 646 398 

June, 1947 71 116 217 135 

Sept. 1947 215 270 558 475 

At the present time, the following figures hold for the term beginning in 
February 1948. 

Number accepted Number signed up 

without exams for exams 

29 232 



o 









L 



UBIVBESITT OF M&SSACHOSETTS 
AT AMHBBST 

The School of Engineering 



Stat ©meat of Acting Dean George A„ Marat on 

before the 
Board of Truetees of the Tfalvorsity of Massachusetts at Fort Dovens 
Hotel Statler, December 30, 19**7 a 6130 P.M. 



MR, CHAIBMAH AUD DISTINGUISHED MSfflEHS OF THE BQAED OP TRUSTEES* 

I hare heen asked to make a brief statement concerning the School of Engi- 
neering at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. As this is ay favorite 
topic right now, it trill probably be better if I follow the script rather closely I 

First, it may be veil to outline the history of the development of engineer- 
ing on the Amherst campus* 

Histogy 

We find in the IS67 bulletin of the College a curriculum vhioh inoluded 
drawing in the freshman year, surveying in the second year and engineering and 
hydrostatics in the Junior year. Some of the early graduates of the College were 
listed as Civil Engineers* 

Between 1893 &&d 1897 • Leonard Metoalf was a professor at the College and 
it was he who later came to Boston and organized the consulting firm of Metoalf 
and Eddy. He was followed by Professor J. E. Ostrander, a civil engineer, who 
was widely known in engineering educational circles* 

* 

In 191*1, a Department of Agricultural Engineering was established, with 
Professor C, X e Gunness as head of the department. In 1938, this department was 
combined with the Civil Engineering work, then given in the Mathematics Department, 
to form a Department of General Engineering, In 19^6. this was separated into 
Civil Engineering and Agricultural Engineering. As of September 1 of this year, 
with the establishment of the School of Engineering, we now have four departments, 
namely 1 Agricultural, Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. None of 
these is as yet accredited by the Engineers 1 Council for Professional Development. 
Through the years many students have transferred to other engineering schools 
after two or three years with us, with full credit for the work taken on our campus*. 
Since 1933 » * our h&v gone to the Thayer School of Civil Engineering at Dartmouth, 
several to M„X e T. ~ the other Land-grant college in Massachusette - and since the 
war six have completed their work at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute,, 

It is interesting to note that in the four years, 19^0 through 19^3» ve had 
2*5 General Engineering graduates t of whom lS are still in professional engineering 
work. Of course, we (like most oohools) number at least one truck driver among 
our graduates but we also have an alumnus who is General Superintendent of Projects 



I 



p 



I 



in the Slew York area for the Baymond Concrete File Company, Others hold respon- 
sible engineering positions with Westlnghouee , Raytheon ; the Federal Government 
and sos© even teaoh in colleges I 

Present Status 

Staff o The standing of any school is very largely determined by the qual- 
ifications and ability of its staff. As many of yon realise, it is not easy 
to attract good men Into educational work, where salaries are generally lover 
than they are in industry. This is particularly true of engineers in these 
times, Nevertheless, by contacting over 1^0 likely prospects we have added eight 
nev men to our staff, thus bringing our professional teaching staff in the four 
departments up to sixtean. Three more will probably be added within the next 
monthe 

These men are, of course, educated as engineers and in all cases have had 
industrial experience. With one exception they have also had previous college 
teaching experience but came to us from industry. We find that we can attract 
good men, for although our salary scale is not high, we are lcoated in a small 
Hew England community which for some is a desirable environment , All of our 
nev staff are under **2 years of age, which I Relieve ie significant. Further- 
more, we have no inbreeding, even though one of our own recent graduates is an 
Assistant Professor of Hydraulic Engineering at another Land-grant university. 

Buildings and Equipment . We have had an Engineering Shop building of about 
16,000 square feet floor area for many years. Thla in largely used "by our 
Stockbridge School students but our engineers obtain their machine shop and 
woodworking eourses in that building. The Engineering Annex is about oompleted 
and besides increasing our Chemistry Laboratory facilities does give us four 
classrooms, two drafting rooms, an electrical machinery laboratory and a room 
that will be used for materials testing. This is a war surplus two-story wooden 
building but it will give us some much needed specs. 

The Engineering Laboratories Building, for which the last legislature pro- 
vided $275,000, has been in tho hands of Mr. Appleton, our Architect, for several 
months and, with the blessing of the Massachusetts Building Commission, will be 
out for bids February 1. The Architect has assured me that this one»story "build- 
ing can be ready September 1, 19^8 even at the present rate of construction! It 
will provide about 21,000 square feet and include inetructional laboratoriee in 
Materials Testing, Internal Combustion Engines, Hefrlgeration, Hydraulice, 
Ventilation and Air Conditioning, Electrical Machinery and Communications; and 
two classrooms and some office space* It must be ready for classes next fall if 
we are to properly handle the engineering students. 

Considerable equipment has been obtained from war suiplus but, as most of 
you know, it is spotty. Some items are available in tremendous quantities while 
others are non-existent. For example, we could probably supply the entire state 
with certain sizes of drills and milling cutters but we could use some metallurg- 
ical microscopes or electric motors. I do not feel that we can be classified 
with some sohools for whom the war wae obviously created but we have benefited 
to a considerable extent. We will have some equipment for the new building but 
we must purchase or otherwise acquire a good share of it. 



I 



I 



! 



Students , Tiiers are 120 engineering students on our own campus. Excluding 
the Chemioal Engineers, there were 6l8 engineers at Devens as of October, 19**7. 
We recently registered 95 of these at Devens for transfer to us in February. 
We hare the staff and facilities to handle this group by scheduling our work 
T9iy closely. Our most critical situation is in our electrical machine ry lab- 
oratory but ve can get by this semester 

About 250 engineers will transfer to us in September, 19^6 and if our 
Engineering Laboratories Building is ready by then, as we fully expect it to be, 
we can properly handle our first and second semester Junior work and the smaller 
groups of our own students in the Senior courses. However, we are Tory short of 
classrooms on our campus and some of cur laboratory work will require evening 
sections. Another smaller group will arrive in February, 19^9, etc., until the 
Devena program is completed, 

Future Heeds 

■■ ■ ■■ ■■ II . I !■ j MVBMMMs 

It now appears that during the first semester of the 19^9-50 echool year 
we will reach our present peak enrollment of about 780 in the School of Engineer- 
ing. To handle this we must have what ve will call the "Main Engineering Build- 
ing*. This must include 11 classrooms, 3 drafting rooms, 6 or 8 small labora- 
tories, a library and adequate office spaoe. The University budget for this 
coming year includes this item as well as additional staff positions to handle 
these students. 

The peak load in the so-called "veterans* bulge" in education will be handled 
on our campus by scheduling all available facilities to their maximum capacity. 
We will certainly have to hold many evening classes, and probably Saturdays will 
net be even a half holiday as at present. However, we expeet that; and the 
facilities we are asking for will allow us to get by this peak and yet of*er a 
good educational program. I am confident that that is what you want and expect 
us to provide for the Devens students on the Amherst campus. 



fl 



! 



\- 



I] 



December 30, 1947 
Report by Robert D. Hawley, Treasurer, University of Massachusetts 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

BUILDINGS CONSTRUCTED AT UNIVERSITY 
IN LAST TWENTY YEARS 
1927-19^7 



Year 

1929 Food Technology Laboratory 
1931 Physical Education Building 
1933-36 4-H Club Houses 
1935 Thatcher Dormitory 
1935 Goodell Library 

1940 Lewis Dormitory ' 

1941 Butterf leld Dormitory 

1946 18 Temporary Dormitories 

and apartment Buildings 
(FPHA) 

1947 Cha&bourne & Greenough Dorms 

1947 4 Wooden Classroom, Laboratory 
and Boarding Hall Annex 
Buildings 



££&£& 


Cost 
federal 


Private 


$ 70,000 


$ 




$ 


172,500 






115,000 
8,900 


116 , 370 


77,580 






143,100 


95,^00 




177,000 
232,600 


40,000 


200,000 


(est,) 








550,000 


25 * 000 


400,000 


(est* ) 



Totals $566,970 $772,980 $l s 083,500 



Buildings Authorized for 1947-48 

Funds Authorized 

Home Economics $643^750 

3 Cement Block Dormitories 550^000 

Engineering Shop 275,000 

Physics Laboratory 450,000 
Animal Disease Control Laboratory 475,000 

Waltham Field Station Building 275 P 000 
Fifth Alumni Dormitory &400,00C 



Totals $2,668,750 $400 ,00C 



1 



S£S 



! 



y 






) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

BUILDINGS REQUESTED IN 1948-49 BUDGET 
(First Priority) 



2 Dormitories $ 350,000 

Engineering Building 1,136,000 

Power Plant and Utility Service Lines 1,170,000 

Boarding Hall Commons 750,000 
Reconstruction of Cavalry Stable for 

Mechanized ROTC 40,000 

Total $3,446,000 



Summary of Buildings Inventory and Needs 

A. Completed 

73 Buildings • $4,260,514 

(Does not include 50 
miscellaneous farm buildings) 

B. In. process of construction 1>593,750 

Home Economics 

3 Cement Block Dorms 

Fifth Alumni Dorm 

C. In planning process 1,475,000 

Physic 8 Laboratory 

Engineering Shop 

Animal Disease Control Laboratory 

Waltham Field Station Building 

Do Budget Request for 1948-49 3,446,000 

Five projects as listed above 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Minutes of Meeting of Board of Trustees of 
University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 

April 29, 194-3, 6:30 P.M., Parker House, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



77 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, Brown, 
Carmichael, Chanaler, Haigis, Hoftyzer, 
Hubbard, Mrs. Leach, Mrs. McNaraara, Taber, 
•Saltonstall, Whitiaore, Keleher, Cluverius, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Vice President Hodnett, Dean Williams, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Dr. Van Meter said that latest plans are to complete the work Devens 



at Devens by June 30, 1949. After that time it is felt that student 
numbers will decline to tine point where it will not be sound educa- 
tionally or economically to continue the branch at Fort Devens. This 
has been agreed by the Devens administration and the administration at 
Amherst unless unforeseen contingencies develop. He pointed out that 
closing Devens at that time will throw additiona load upon the Univer- 
sity at Amherst and that rapid completion of the building program is 
essential. 

Dr. Van Meter distributed copies of the attached table indi- 
cating the flow of students expected from Devens to Amherst and plans 
for completion of dormitory units to take care of housing of the stu- 
dents . 

Dr. Hodnett reported on the current status of the program at 
Devens. There are 14-54- students enrolled this spring. There will be 
about 900 in the fall of 1943 and 600 left in the spring of 1949. 






7; 



Public 

Housing 

Authority 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

The faculty at present numbers 123 teachers, about 50 
having been released in the fall of 194-7 • He reported on the method 
of selecting the faculty to be released and those to be retained and 
said that there were no complaints of unfair treatment at the time 
the group was released in the fall. Student morale is good. 

Some buildings which were not converted for classroom use 
have been returned to the Army. The new Boarding Hall has proved to 
be a great improvement over the old one. 

Dr. Hodnett pointed out that a number of leases ana con- 
tracts which were entered into by the Board for the period ending 
June 30, 19^8 will need to be renewed for another year. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To approve a contract with the Public Housing 
Authority for the use of land, buildings, and 
equipment for housing purposes at Fort Devens 
by the University of 24assachusetts at Fort 
Devens and to authorize the Assistant Treasurer 
of the Board to sign said contract in the name 
of and for the Board of Trustees. 

It was 



Vocational 

Rehabilitation 

Training 



Leasing of 
Grounds and 
Buildings 



VOTED : To approve a contract with the Veterans Ad- 
ministration for the vocational rehabilitation 
training of veterans under Public Law 16 at 
Fort Devens by the University of Massachusetts 
at Fort Devens and to authorize the Assistant 
Treasurer of the Board to sign a contract in 
the name of and for the Board of Trustees. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize Dr. Edward Kodnett, Vice President 
of the University of Massachusetts, to sign a 
lease from the War Department for personal 
property now being used by the College at Fort 

Devens . 

Dr. Hodnett reported that three students have requested 
permission to continue at Devens after their entitlements under 



! 



79 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Public Lav 34-6 have expired. Dr. Hocinett felt that these students 

should not be allowed to continue at Devens but should transfer to 

Amherst at that time. After discussion, it was 

VOTED; To approve policy of not permitting students Public 

to continue at Devens after expiration of Lav *"& 

their entitlements under Public i»av 346 but 
with the understanding that these students may 
continue their college work at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst if they so desire. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 P.M. 



Chairman 



^Secretary 










MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AT FOBT DEVENS 

August 18, 1943, 11:00 A.M., Mr. Bartlett's Office, Boston 



I 



I 



PRESENT : Chairman Bartlett, President Cluverius, 
President Keleher, President Van Meter, 
and Commissioner Desmond. There were 
also present Mr. Brett, Dean Williams, 
and Treasurer iiawley 

The resignation of Dr. Hodnett as Vice president was received. 

Dr. Hodnett explained that he has accepted the position of President of 

Fenn College and expects to take up active duties there September 1, 

194-3. Therefore, it was 

VOTED : To accept the resignation of Dr. Hodnett, 
effective August 31, 1943. 

Upon the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Dean Wentvorth Williams as Vice 

President to succeed Dr. Hodnett at a. salary 
of #7,500. 

Upon the recommendation of President Van Meter and Dean 

Williams, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Dean Stokes Dean of the College at 
Fort Devens, with the understanding that the 
position will include the duties formerly ascribed 
to the Dean of the Faculty and the Dean of the 
Students and there be one increment of increase 
in the salary of this position above the regular 
rate, which Dean Stokes would otherwise receive. 

Consideration was given to the method of installation of 

Dr. Williams in his new office and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the administration at Fort Devens 

to carry out an appropriate Inauguration ceremony. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:00 noon. 




Hodnett, 
Edward - 

resignation 



Williams, 
Wentworth - 

Vice President 



Stokes, Joseph 

M. - 

Dean of the 

College 



Inauguration 



etary pro tern 



82 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



r^ 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AT FORT DEVENS 
Office of the Vice President 



19 January 1949 



I 



The trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts *t Fort Devens 

Gentlemen: 

I have the honor to present to you the annual report of the University 
of Massachusetts At Fort Devens for the calendar year 1948* During that year we 
competed the physical plant originally projected in 1946, acquired adequate 
suop-ies and equipment, reached our peak enrollment, and employed our largest 
staffs in all areas of' activity - Instruction, Operation, and Maintenance, The 
pager, which follow tell all too briefly of growth and improvement, ana of effi- 
ciency and economy in operations. For those of^us who came early to the staff, 
it is a heartening story and cause for satisfaction. 

However, this is not a one-man venture *W more than it is the achieve- 
ment of a select few.. Behind us and always ready to help have stood the authori- 
ties at Amherst and officials of the Commonwealth at the State House, Without 
their support this venture would have been impossible.. But over ana beyond all 
this woven into the factual materials of this report and implicit in every line, 
there run the warp and woof of a fabric made of the unstinted loyalty, devotion, 
and boundless service of all members of the college community - students, 
employees, faculty - the oriceless ingredient of a venture such as this. Without 
it we would indeed be what a national periodical so ineptly and inaccurately 
called us - n a makeshift college," With *e have become a college in the 
finest sense, for not only do we educate in terms of texts and course, but al; 
in t.»rms of developing a sense of persona], responsibility for active and con- 
structive living ana leadership in the democracy which these young men have so re- 
cently fought to preserve I am proud to have been a part of and to have served 
the community that has made this achievement possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Wentworth Williams 
Vice President 



I 



I 



I 



TVERSITI OF MASSACHUSETTS AT FQET DESTEHS 
Annual .Report to the Trustees 

ENROLLMENTS 

The University of Massachusetts At Fort Devens reached its peak enrollment 
in September 194?, at -rfhich time it opened its Fall Semester with 1755 students. 
Subsequent enrollments have been as follows: February 1948 - 1479; Summer Session, 
first six weeks, 36^ - second six weeks, 222; September 1948 - 813, of whom 244 were 
new students. The preliminary registration for February 1949 indicates an enroll- 
ment of 585 - 600 studentso This whole downward trend results, of course, from two 
majos factors; (a) the fact that the great bulk of veterans qualified to carry college 
level work has been admitted to college; and (b) our status as a four* semester 
college causes us to transfer students more rapidly than we admit them. 

Present indications are that nearly 194 students will transfer at the end 
of the current semester. Of these it appears that about 166 will so to the main 
campus at Amherst. Next, June the balance of our student body will transfer else- 
where, Kow many cf these will gc to the main campus depends upon the numbers ao> 
mitted by ether institutionso However, if due allowance is made for transfers else- 
where wi th special consideration of transfers to schools of business administration, 
the following* tables will give some basis for estimating the probable distribution, 
by majcrs, of students transferring to the parent carapuSo 

Ma tor Field Probable Transfers Potential Transfers 

-=**-*•- — * ~ February 1948 «"u ne W48 

c 26 

rnculture ? 

Horticulture •*-*■ -i' 

1 sines s Administration 29 J*£ 

61 2j 



engineering 
Liberal. Arts 

ysical Education 

Science 
Special 



42 97 

2 ^ 



194 59i 



TRANS FERS TO OTHSR COLLING J£ 

Since October 1946, we have enrolled 2690c The largest group was, of 
course, our opening class of 1317. The second largest class, 474 students enrolled 
in September 1947; our third largest, 380 students, in February 194V- Of the total 
registration to date, departures from this campus have been as follows; 7*k were 
reassigned to the Amherst campus; 471 transferred to other colleges; 251 withdrew 
for reasons of scholarship, finances, and miscellaneous causes; and 248 dropped ou. 
for reasons unknown , 



I 



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. . budents understood, "bo have transferred to other ii. .•' 
432 have supplied information showing transfers to 111 institutions*. The range of 
institutions is quits surprising, for the list includes Alaska University, SVdnc 
itralia, California Polytechnic, Southwestern Louisiana Institute^ Montana 
ivarsity, Harvard, Colorado, Massachusetts Institute of technology, Texas. Yale, 
and JfCSillo 



Reports, from those students indicate their feeling of having received good 
preparation to carry on their courses of study at these newer institutions* In 
nearly all cases they also report that they miss the spirit and comradeship of 
Devens, not only as be Ween students but especially as between faculty and student & a 

TH| ACTiyiTISS PROGRAM 

Numerous events of outstanding interest and importance attest to the wis- 
dom of establishing a Division of Activities to round out, coordinate, aad guide 
the development of ca&pua activities* The Masquers, open to all members of the 
Devens community, presented three major offerings in dramatics? "A texrde-r Has Been 
Arranged 5 ' - 3 days in February; ** an excellent presentation of "The Man Who Game To 
Dinner" - 3 days in Hay; and "George Washington Slept Here" - requiring a fourth 
perforroance, by popular request, to round out its November schedule.* In addition, 
two sets of experimental plays were read to selected audiences,. The Masquers also 
joined with the Glee Club in their annual Christmas program ~ the former group pre- 
senting the traditional "Second Shepherd's Play", the latter a prograri of Christmas 
music and carols. The Glee Club produced the Operetta "Patience" and an excellent 
Kinstral Show, 

ISome fifteen to twenty campus clubs gave ample opportunity for student 
to meet in programs of special interest « The Newman and Hillel groups held several 
social functions^ the Outing Club ran a three day Winter Carnival> other clubs : 
specialized fields held numerous gatherings* Trie Radio Club continued its major 
activity in Station WFDK with several special feature programs in addition t3 its 
regular 4* hour program presented JTive nights a weak during the college year 

The Social Committee of the Student Senate and the class organizations 
sponsored a Moonlight Cruise on Massachusetts Bay, and regular dances, weekly g.: 
bi-weekly, at :he Arbelia Club. In addition, a Spring ?rcm was held at the Bos tor: 
City Club in April, and a Mid-Winter Formal at the '/endorse in December. Let me add 
that i have attended all formal dances of the college, and am proud and happy to 
report that they have been so well organized and so finely conducted that ths maii= 
agement of the hotels and at least one orchestra leader have characterised tile . 
a^ees of one Devens groups as being among the finest with which they have been 
connected,, 

The StATKSM&S, our campus weekly newspaper, and the COMHON WiSALTE, our 
literary quarterly, have maintained a high standard of editorship, ha ve given 
valuable experience in reporting, editorial work, and creative writing, and have 
done much to help develop and advance a sense of unity and fine college spirito 

ATHUgtlpS 

Any attempt to understand the achievements of the athletic coaching staffs 
at DeVens must be based .jpou a recognition of tiie fact that since this is s two-year 

— 2= 



I 



college, the coach m.st create a new team each year, Jfev-ertheless, and quits* wisely, 
we feel, In terms of morale here ind the general prestige of the University, the 
Head of the Division of Physical Education and Athletics, has always sought to in- 
clude in our athletic schedules a maximum of rseognised collegiate institutions. In 
consequence, we have had the interesting situation in which a two-year institution 
has played long and exacting schedules with four-year college teams, and has made a 
creditable showing at all times* 

On this basis, the aggregate of wins and losses becomes interesting. In 
nine varsity sports, we won 28 gam<ss, lost 56, and tisd 3. * , 4any losses were by a 
narrow margin - a defeat to be sure but there is still roost for pride in a closely 
fought game with Harvard, Amherst, Holy Cross, Boston University, Boston College, 
Williams, the University of Connecticut, and others. 

Intraneural sports^ always a vital part of our program, have offered league 
series in touch football, basketball, baseball, softball, and volleyball. All told 
approximately six hundred students engaged in one or another of these leagues. In 
addition, three golf tournaments ware held - open to all members of the college 
dommunity. Two were won by students, one by a faculty member. The golf team placed 
third in the #ew England Intercollegiate matches, and the Cross Country teats com- 
peted in the New England Intercollegiate ran, 

guiBANcs and comssuLim 

From the very beginning, Guidance has been recognized on this campus as a 
vital and essential service in an educational institution. It becomes doubly so in 
a collage which has a student body that is 100 per cent composed of veterans of the 
Armed Forces. Accordingly, our earliest planning included provision for the employ* 
meat of a staff member trained in Guidance techniques and procedures. In addition, 
the staff in Psychology has always been closely coordinated with the work of the 
Guidance Office to insure that a maximum of trained help be available at all times # 
In January 1943, the college was able to obtain the full*- time services of a psycho- 
meirist who assisted the Guidance Office and the Psychology group in their work* 
Subsequently, when the psychometrist moved elsewhere, we secured a second person also 
trained' in thia workc 

Thus far, as indicated by the records of the Guidance Center which was set 
up for the students, sosus six hundred students hava received help. A large propor- 
tion of thia group have been given specialized tests to sorve as a basis for counsel- 
ing procedures. Beyond that they have received personal help, in many cases amount- 
ing to well over ten hours of personal assistance. These services are being 
increased and will continue intensively until the college has finished its work as an 
institution, farther service has been rendered through group tests administered to 
all freshmen electing engineering and science majors* Other group tests have been 
administered to business administration and economic majors. In both cases tho 
purpose was to assist in determining the aptitude of the incftviduals for the particular 
fields in which they indicated a desire to Carry on their major studi3Sr 

In addition to these services, members of the faculty have served as a 
part of the Advisory syst*eau These faculty members were carefully selected and then 
were called together for group discussions with the Supervisor of Guidance to clarify 
the airas and procedures of the guidance service* Following this, the students were 
assigned in numbers of ten to fifteen p^r faculty member and were clearly informed 



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that these faculty advisors would be available to them at any time during office 
hours for personal help as required. In addition to that, faculty members were re- 
quired to hold an initial interview with each advisee for the purpose of becoming 
acquainted with the individual and of learning enough about him to make future con- 
tacts fruitf il. In all cases, faculty were requested to submit anecdotal reports 
on special points which seemed unusually significant. The services rendered by 
thess faculty counsellors have been invaluable and have contributed much to the 
successful operation of th$ entire Guidance and Counseling program* 

FACULTY 

Coincident with the large registrations of the 1947*-48 academic year, the 
faculty grew to a total of 144 persons., including deans, heads of divisions, and 
all members of the Divisions of Instruction, Actual elassroom instruction was con- 
ducted by 130 staff members, including a few part-time instructors secured from the 
graduate students of Harvard University, all of whom were residents at Harvardevens 
Village, located within the Fort Devens reservation and about two miles distant 
from our campus, This opportunity to secure mature students in advanced study made 
it possible to expand and contract our staff as conditions developed az*d thus en- 
able i us to supply competent teaching, as needed, without binding the Commonwealth 
to long term contracts at an excessive cost as well as without committing individuals 
to tie need of moving to Devens in the face of the numerous uncertainties involved 
in oo.r operations as a temporary institution. 

From our peak load and faculty, we quickly moved to the sharply reduced 
conditions of September 194S. Our present academic year opened with 83 members in 
our staff of instruction, 72 of th^m being members cf the teaching staff v 

All told 70 individuals have passed across the campus as member? of our 
staff of instruction. While we are disappointed that but 12 of thi9 group have been 
accepted as transfers to the parent campus, it is a pleasure to report that 47 are 
in teaching positions, 8 are taking further graduate study, 1 left us by reason of 
recall to service in the Navy, 2, being married, have stopped what was essentially 
a temporary activity, 1 has left teaching by reason of poor health, 2 are in the 
employ of th-3 Department of the Army, 1 is in the employ of the Massachusetts Housing 
Commissi on > and 8 have entered or re-entered business or professional activities: 

But it is not enough to be pleased that 70 former members of our teaching 
staff are reasonably well placed in other positions or activities* We who are re- 
sponsible for this collegs now face the inescapable fact that the closing of this 
campus next June gives us approximately 150 days in which to help in the placement 
of the 83 members of the staff of instruction „ 

In anticipation of this situation, I have already circularized the chief 
officers of some 500 collegiate institutions (including several large preparatory 
schools) across the continent for the purpose of telling them of the prospective 
closing of this college and thus of the availability of this faculty for filling 
teaching vacancies which are scheduled to occur * I am happy to report that the 
preliminary response has been most heartening and that several members of the staff 
are already in correspondence with outside institutions.. 

We hope, of course, that the main campus of the university will find room 
for more than the previous 14 per cent selected from the aarlier group released from 



; I ' 



service here.. With a full recognition of the. limitations imposed by the budget 
enacted by the General Court, plus the necessity and desirability that the uiii- 
versity shall select the strongest possible faculty as it expands to meat its new 
responsibilities, we cannot escape the hope that the desire for a high statistical 
average of advanced degrees in newly acquired staff will not cause the bypassing 
of these temporary members of the university staff «• many of whom are in the vory 
process of obtaining advanced degree© - most of whom have served faithfully for two 
or three years on this faculty, and have demonstrated a fine ability as teachers, a 
devotion to the interests and welfare of their students, and a loyalty to and 
willingness to serve the university to a degree no less than that which exists at the 
parent campus c I assert without qualification that a failure to search carefully 
and with open minds through the staff of this college can serve only to cause the 
university to suffer additional loss through its failure to obtain permanently the 
staff jaembers no; available to it from this campuso 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

1 am pleased to report that the business and financial operations of the 
college are conducted efficiently and economically « Because ife were a new institu- 
tion and thus ;jnable to predict our budgetary requirements within the range of 
accuracy required of other departments of the Comr.ionwealth, the Governor, the 
General Court, the Joint Ways and Means Committee, and the Commission on Administra- 
tion and Finance, have accepted our estiToates and then have trusted us to spend 
wisely and carefully wherever possible I take great pride in reporting that in all 
operations^ those under Sro Rodnett, my predecessor, and those under ray supervision, 
we hav3 amply justified this trust, Wherever possible to do so without injury to 
our teaching or operational procedures, vacancies have remained unfilled, back orders 
have been cancelled, and supply demands reduced* Repairs have been generous, but 
closely supervised,, The results are reflected in the following paragraphs: 

a, The Fiscdi 1945 budget allocated $2,060,000 to this college. Upon 
the request of Governor Bradford that all departments save 10 per 
cent of their budgets, this campus obligated itself to save 
$206,000. It so h&ppen® $ however, that in the final rush of setting 
up the supplementary buaget for the Commonwealth, the State House 
omitted an additional $87,000 necessary to care for the salary in- 
creases allocated to this campus under the new State salary scale 
just adopted. In spite of this ondssian, the college absorbed the 
full $87,000 and still returned a net surplus of $22&,00Q, which was 
11 per cent of its original budget, or a gross saving of §33.5,000, 
which is approximately 14 „ Z % of the gross adjusted budget* 

b, On the basis of operations during the first half of the current 
fiscal year, we shall again complete our operations with a substan- 
tial surplus, and shall again absorb in our original budget a larga 
sum - approximately #65,000 - to cover other state- wide raise s c 

c, In 1946, this college had the right of entry to 330 buildings. As 
of 31 Dacember 1948, 232 had been returned to the Army, leaving 

93 buildings in the hands of the college,. Of the original group, 
71 were leased to the college by the Federal Works Authority, and 
thus were covered by insurance. Thirty of these buildings have been 



? - 



f i ; 



rsivmed "to the Ansy ? adducing our basic coverage by $5S5,OOQ, with. 
a consequent reduction of approximately $5,000 in insurance premiums, 
a saving of #12,000 annually in fire protection and snow reranval 
costs and about $1,800 annually for electricity charges. 

Ad of 1 Sspteisbar 1946, the college occupied 106 of the family quarters 
available in the permanent area of the reservation « Bowaver, since the reactivation 
of fort Deven* created an emergency in the housing of military personnel, the college 
has released vacant housing as rapidly &* the shrinkage in faculty has permitted. Ae 
of 31 December 1943. 40 units had been released to the Army; additional unite are to 
be processed as soon as any vacancy occurs. 

Previous paragraphs have pointed out that faculty employment has been kept 
at the lowest point consistent with the highest needs of our students. The same 
principle has been applied to the Business and the Maintenance staffs of the college, 
So services have been slighted* Heither have any been maintained beyond the date 
they were needed, Repair* and renewals have been ample to «naintain a maximum of ef«« 
ficieacyj but nothing has been done that was not necessary* 

Library accessions during 1946 amounted to over 5*000 volumes, and 
brought the aggregate book collection to approximately 16,000 volumes^ as of 31 
December 1948.. Circulation for the year was 10, 43 5 , ae compared with 7*565 in 1947* 
The reference section consists of some 800 volumes and includes most of the standard 
reference material for undergraduate students* Rotable acquisitions of reference 
worke ttere the New Oxford Di ctiona ry and the Ancient, Ifederial , and Mode rn Cambridge 
Hi stories „ While no figure© are available on the use of the Reserve Book Room, the 
| pressure placet* upon its facilities testifies to the increased use of its facilities 

For a new college, such as the campus at Devens, the statistical reports 
of the Librarian are more than mere collections of figures* they are the story of 
the growth and the vigor of that part of the campus which is frequently and correctly 
called the heart of the educational plant, Tnanks to the carefully considered 
support, rendered by budget appropriations*, and to the generosity of faculty who have 
donated large numbers of excellent volumes from their own collections, the library 
has materially expanded its facilities and has gained strs^ngth thereby. Above all, 
however, credit must go to the Librarian for the wise and farsighted policies by which 
he ha3 guided the development of the library and the activities of an excellent staff 
as they have helped create this facility and administer its services to the commun*- 
ity, Throughout our existence, the library has served well and effectively as a 
vital factor in. what has been accomplished here 1 , 

RSLATIQgSHXPS WltH TH5 ARffi 

The university of Massachusetts At Fort Devens is located within the 
boundaries of a ndlitary reservation, occupies Army buildings, usee office equipment 
leased, from the Army* shares with the Arm/ the many facilities of certain services • 
The smooth and efficient conduct of any set of relationships as complex as these can 
occur only when there is complete good will, a spirit of cooperation, and a sincere 
desire to understand the needs and responsibilities of the groups involved* 



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I take great pleasure in making a matter of official record the rery 
splendid spirit of helpfulness and cooperation which has characterized our relation- 
ships with the nsllitary authorities throughout the thirty months we have beew here at 
Fort Devens. Lieutenant Colonel Charles £\ Knov/ltoa, Colonels w~in£5.eld S P McKay and 
Kenneth S* Strotfcer, and Major General Robert tf* Grow, all have been most understand- 
ing and helpful. Our debt to them and their personnel is very great, indeed c 

SOCIAL C0URG5-S FOE AKMX Pmsom 

Pursuant to a vote (by mail) of the Trustees, we organised and offered 
courses in English. Economics, Mathematics, and K 4 story for military personnel, Un- 
fortunately, such exigencies as transfers to other stations, attendance at technical 
schools, unforeseeable duties, and, in some cases, a notable drop in enthusiasm, 
have combined to reduce registration from an original 100 to 12. These men have met 
entrance requirements, cla3S attendance and attainment standards, and have the 
&pprova2. of their instructors to take the final examinations with other students at 
the regular examination sessions 

SPECIAL MATTERS 

Conference On Th» Creative Arts 

Last April this campus sponsored a Conference on the Creative Arts in the 
New England Colleges, Students and faculty members from 34 New ongland colleges ac- 
cepted invitations to attend, and some 300 were present during the two days of the 
meetings. Miss Iris Mabry, a featured performer of the modern dance, dance groups 
from Boston University and the Connecticut College for Wolffian, ind the Smith College 
and Anther st College Glee Clubs, were prominently featured in the program. At the 
final meeting, addresses were given by Hiss Rosamond Gilder, a leading dramatic 
critic and a U, S. representative at UNESCO, and by Dr. Howard Kumford Jones a of the 
English Faculty at Harvard University, 

Because of the outstanding success of this first venture, and the 
contin^ii.ng interest which it engendered, plans are now in process for a second con- 
ference to be held at Devens, again in April. The American .National Theater and 
Academy, established by Act of Congress, is actively interested in the project, and 
will lend its leadership in setting up the program and in obtaining group and dis- 
cussion leaders. Present indications lead to the hope that this yearns conference 
will be even more effective and significant than was that of a year ago e 

Given tvo years of successful operati.cn, the conference could, and ought 
to bscome an annual feature of the Spring Semester calendar c We who have brought it 
into being, very sincerely hope that our parent campus will be moved to carry on when 
we have gone and that the Conference On The Creative Arts will become an annual fix- 
ture and a source of high credit to the University 

Af-EftJAX, COffljRMCZ OF SL8H5NTAEY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 

At the request of 14r, John J, Desmond, Jr., Commissioner of idu nation, 
the Annual Conference of Elementary School Principals (of Massachusetts) will be 
held at the fort Bevens campus Monday and Tuesday, IS and 19 April 1949. The 



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prograia will be arranged by the proper authorities at the Department of TUducationj 
Cevena will supply housings conference space, and the dining hall. Preliminary 
planning has already started at Devens, and will be coordinated with conference 
authorities as their plane develop e 

OHAgSS OF BPILPffTO FOR BIOLOGY 

tih&n this caiapus opened in September 1946, the laboratory facilities, 
for all -^rk in Biology and related courses were set up in Barnstable Hall, formerly 
the conaaissary building of tte military post* However, with the re-activation of 
Fort D^reBs as an array post, the critical need for a building to serve as a control 
and saj.es centor for commissary supplies required by units and personnel of the post 
compelled the military authorities to request the return of the Post Commissary 
Building* 

Three factors influenced our decision to take action as requested,, 
First, the existence of built-in refrigerators and refriger-ition units, together with 
a platJ'orrG connecting the building to the cold-storage plant, made the use of the 
building the least expensive solution of the problem. Second, our reduced enroll- 
ment for the Fall (1943-49) Semester permitted us to operate all work with 
Biological Sciancas in a aRich reduced space, Third, the military authorities agreed 
to accept the building in an n ae is" condition, without repairs by the Commonwealth, 
and also to assist in the preparation of a new biology building by supplying vital, 
labor said materials * Work on the change began during August. The job was com* 
pleted on tirae^ and enabled us to conduct work in the new building, designated 
Hampshire Hall,, with the opening of the Fall Semester in September 194#. 



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83 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst, Mass. 



November 22V, 1948 



To Members of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 

The following letter of November 1, j-945> from Secretary 

Burke to members of the Board of Trustees of the University of 

Massachusetts at Fort Devens and the resultant mail ballot are 

hereby made part of the official records of the Board. 



November 1, 194-3 



To Members of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 



Two items are pressing for attention you may be willing to 
act on these by mail baxlot to avoid the necessity of calling together 
all the members of the Board. Both have the approval of President 
Van Meter. One is a request on the part of the Troop information and 
Education Officer stationed with the Army at Fort Devens to allow 
members of the University staff to teach elementary courses in English, 
Mathematics, Economics and History to members of the Army Troops 
stationed at the Fort. This program would not involve any expense on 
the part of the State. The second is the need for authorizing Vice- 
President Williams to renew certain leases required in the operation 
of the University at Fort Devens. 

Two copies of this letter and ballot are submitted so that 
you may retain one for your information. 

Courses to be offered to Members of the United States Army 

The military authorities at Fort Devens, through the Troop 
Information and Education Officer, have requested the Fort Devens 
branch of the University of Massachusetts to offer elementary college 
level courses in English, Mathematics, Economics and history. 
Registrants for these courses shall be such members of the troops 
stationed at Fort Devens as are specifically interested and are 
qualified to meet the admission requirements of the University of 
Massachusetts. Registrants shall be graduates of secondary schools 
and shall be required to submit official transcripts of records. Those 
not acceptable on the basis of the secondary school record must attain 
satisfactory grades in standardized tests in English, Mathematics, 
and scholastic aptitude, these tests to be of the same standard as 
those given to other applicants for admission to the University. 

Registrants must be approved by the committee on admissions 
of the University of Massachusetts. 



84 



a 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACiiU SECTS 

Amherst, Mass. 

Courses of instruction shall meet the following standards: 
(l) Instructors shall be selected from those regularly giving the 
courses in question. (2) Course content and tests shall be the same 
as those of the courses offered in the regular curriculum of the 
University. (3) Class shall be held two nights per week, two hours 
per night to insure the completion of the proper number of hours and 
course content equivalent to that of the course regularly offered. 

Completion of a course with a grade which meets the standards 
of the University of Massachusetts shall entitle the registrant to an 
official grant of credit for each course so completed. 

1 vote approve offering college courses with credit to 

not to 

Army Personnel stationed at Fort Devens under the conditions as outlined 
above. 

Renewal of Leases 



b. 



In the past the Board of Trustees has authorized Vice 
President Hodnett, by name, to execute leases for personal property 
used at Fort Devens and to execute agreements for services covering 
student laundry and the operation of the Old Colony Theatre for 
motion pictures by students. These leases are now due for renewal 
and meantime Dr. Hodnett has been succeeded by Dr. iftent worth W. Williams. 
Therefore, new authority is needed from the Board. 

1. 1 vote authorize the Vice President of the University 

not to 

Massachusetts to sign a renewal lease for Army personal property now in 
use by the University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens, said lease being 
between the Secretary of War and. the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
the term September 1, 194& through August 31> 194-9 • 

2. 1 vote to x authorize the Vice President of the University 

not to 

of Massachusetts to execute~~tTT"behalf of the University of Massachusetts 

at Fort Devens agreements for the following. 

a. Laundry service for students or individuals on the 
campus to be furnished by City Cleansers and Palace 
Laundry of Fitchburg at no expense to or income for 
the University or the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

b. Moving pictures by the Old Colony Theatre Company (a 
student company) to be shown six days per week in the 
Old Colony Theatre on the Campus. The University is 
to supply the equipment and utilities and the concession- 
aire is to pay the University 5% of total receipts 
less Federal taxes. 






65 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst, Mass. 

November 1, 194-3 



Signed ; 



If. L. Keleher 
Carl S. £11 
A. C. Brett 
John M. Deely 



Elizabeth L. McMamara Ralph F. Taber 



W. T. Cluverius Charles V*. Cole 
James B. Conant Frank L. Boy den 
Harry Dunlap Brown John Chandler 
John J. Desmond, Jr. Ernest Hoftyzer 




ames W. Burke 
Secretary 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

Minutes of Meeting of Board of Trustees of the University of 

Massachusetts at Fort Devens 

January 19, 1949, 6:30 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brown, Caraichael, 
Chandler, Desmond, Hubbard, Whitmore, 
Mrs. Leach, Mrs. McNamara, Keleher, 
Marsh, Ell, O'Brien, President Van Meter, 
Vice President Williams, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke, Dean Stokes, Mr. Mahan 

It was 

VOTED: To dispense with reading of the call and with 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

President Van Meter reviewed high lights of the Devens 
program since its inception and said that the program is running 
on schedule, that students have transferred to the Amherst campus 
as anticipated, and that the Administration at Amherst and at 
Devens are fully agreed that the Devens branch can and should be 
closed in June of 194-9. At that time the remaining 600 students 
at Devens will be transferred to the Amherst campus. He complimented 
the Board for its sagacity and perseverance in handling the veterans 1 
educational program. 

Vice President Williams presented a report of progress of 

the past year (see copy attached). On the recommendation of Vice 

President Williams and President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Dr. Wentworth Williams, Vice 

President of the University of Massachusetts, 
to execute in behalf of tne University of 
Massachusetts at Fort Devens the following: 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



67 



1. An agreement or concessionaire's license in 
behalf of "lie University of Massachusetts at 
Fort Devens for a renewal of the original 
license whereby Samuel Stern of Brookline, 
Massachusetts, has installed ana maintained 
Bendix coin washing machines in certain 
specified locations on the campus for use of 
students, faculty and other University 
personnel. Said machines to continue to be 
operated for ten (10) cents per operation and 
the concessionaire to pay the University 5% 
of his total monthly receipts. It is further 
stipulated that said renewal shall not extend 
beyond September 30, 194-9 and thaL it shall 
oroviie means for earlier cancellation. 



Bendix 

washing 

machines 



I 



2. An agreement or concessionaire's license for 
a Television Club to be operated by R. Conrad 
Jones (a veteran attending Harvard University) 
and managed by a Devens student. The club is 
to operate for the period January 1 to May 31, 
1949 unless otherwise terminated. Technical 
equipment to be furnished by the concessionaire; 
utilities to be furnished by the University. 
The concessionaire is to pay the University 5% 
of his gross receipts from memberships. 

Dr. Williams said that the faculty at Devens would like to 
have a survey made to evaluate the total accomplishment at Devens. 
At first the faculty thought of doing this themselves but finally de- 
cided that it might look too much like a compliment to themselves and 
so they are asking instead that an outside group of three or four 
educators be employed to conduct the survey as to what Devens has 
accomplished for its students in the classroom, in extra curricular 
activities, and in all around development of the students as good 
citizens. 



Television 
Club 



Survey of 
Accompli shments 
at Devens 



I 



There was some discussion by the Board as to how far such a 
survey could go and accomplish worth while results. It was agreed 
that a record of the Devens program should be filed for future 
reference but it was not clear just what might be accomplished by 



this survey. After discussion, it was 



$ 88 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



VOTED : To refer this question with power to the 
Executive Committee so that the Executive 
Committee might consider what the survey 
should cover and what financial limits 
should be imposed. 

On the recommendation of Vice President Williams and 

President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To close the Devens branch of the University 
Devens - of Massachusetts in June of 194-9 and to 

closed authorize a final Convocation as part of the 

closing. 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:4.5 P.M. 



Chairman 



^Secretary 



ad 

d 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



MINUTES OF NESTING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES, UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AT FORT DEVENS 

April 7, 1949, 3:50 P.M., xMr. Bartlett 1 s Office, Boston 

Chaiman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Carmichael, Desmond, 

Keleher, Orton, President Van Meter, Vice 
President Williams, Dean Stokes, Chief 
Fiscal Officer Mahan, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretarv Burke 



89 



It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Vice President Williams said that since the meeting in 

January, he had made further study of the proposal to employ an educator 

or educators to study the Devens program and operation so that an 

historical record may be assembled. He has contacted the American 

Council on Education which is very much interested. The Council has 

offered to make a survey and has submitted a definite proposal. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached memorandum of agreement 
between the Universitv of Massachusetts at Fort 

■ 

Devens and the American Council on Education call- 
ing for an expenditure of not to exceed $7500, 
provided sums are made available. 

It was also 

VOTED: To authorize Vice President Williams to recuest 
authorization from the Commission on Administra- 
tion & Finance to expend not to exceed $7500 for 
purpose of financing the study as voted above. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize Vice President Williams to enter into 
contract with the American Council on Education in 
accordance with terms of memorandum attached hereto 
provided that the Commission on Administration & 
Finance approves the expenditure of not to exceed 



American 
Council on 
Education 



f 90 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 



|7500 and the memorandum of agreement is approved 
as to form by the Attorney General. 

Vice President Williams said that he has been in 
discussion with the Commission on Administration & Finance con- 
cerning the closing out of Devens. He was advised not to submit 
a budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 19 A9 as he will 
be turning in approximately $250,000 unexpended balance and it is 
proposed that the Legislature will make this fund available to 
the Commission to meet expenses of closing. There was discussion 
as to responsibility of the Trustees in the closing out of Devens 
and Vice President Williams agreed to look through all contracts 
and call these contracts to the attention of Chairman Bartlett as 
to any possible liability. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4-^50 P.M. 



^Secretary 



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'^draijdu:: of AoassaEuy 

between 
the University of Kajjsachusetts at Fort Devens 

and 

the iUnerican Council on Education 

drafted at Fort Devens > llaesachnsetts 

Tiarch k, 19h9 



1. The terns of this agreement are natter of negotiation, and have 
no binding force unless and until subscribed to by persons duly author- 
ized to sign contracts for each of the two parties named above* 

2. At the invitation of the University of Massachusetts at Fort 
Devens, the AGS undertakes to survey the University of Massachusetts at 
Fort Devens and prepare a report addressed to the 3oard of Trustees. 

3. The purposes of the projected survey include: 

(a) To record for possible future emergencies the essential 
outlines of the experience of the state of Massachusetts in 
establishing and operating the University of Massachusetts at 
Fort Devens for a period of three years for the purpose of meet- 
ing an overwhelming need for incroased higher educational 
facilities » 

(b) To evaluate the practically unique experience of an emer- 
gency institution United to veteran enrollment and with all 
students receiving federal allowances for maintenance and for 
tuition and incidentals. 

(c) To appraise the University of Massachusetts at Fort Devens 
as an institution which became in effect a pilot experiment in 
the federal subsidization of higher education, with maximum 
freedom from political pressures, somewhat as subsequently 
recommended by the President 1 s Committee on Higher Education. 

(d) To analyze certain novel and presiamably unique character- 
istics of the organization and operation of the University of 
Ilassachusetts at Fort Devens in its opportunity as a wholly now 
institution, to initiate and offer from the beginning a program 
of standard college work, 

(e) To record for the people of the state, their accomplishment 
in this instance of provision of an expansion of higher educa- 
tional opportunities for the young men of the state who are 
qualified but financially handicaoped, as a rruidepc-st toward meet- 
ing future needs of the sane nature. 

U» The projected survey will cover, among others, the following 
aspects of the institution: 

(a) Organization and functioning of the faculty; 

(b) The administration; 

(c) The total effectiveness of the institution; 



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(d) The fiscal operation of the institution; 

(e) Student personnel work, including student activities and 
the service of guidance and counseling; 

(f) Instruction, with attention to (a) the fundamental and applied 
sciences, and (b) the humanities and the social scicncoso 

£. The AGE Tri.ll conduct the survey as nearly as possible in accord 
idth a plan of obtaining the temporary services of approximately three 
experts in various areas of higher education, who will spend approximately 
from one to three weeks each in full-tine work on the survey, of wiich tiiTie 
approximately one-half is expected to be spent at the University of 
Massachusetts at Fort Devens* Sacli expert will study and report upon 
selected aspects of the institution] the reports thus obtained to be con- 
solidated into a single report by the entire survey staff. 

6« The ACE will make available £0 copies of the report in mimeographed 
form, estimated to comprise approximately 100 pages of double—spaced typing, 
on I'ay 25, 19U9, provided completion of the report on or before that date 
proves to be feasible; it is understood that if meeting that deadline proves 
to be not feasible, as determined by the survey staff, then completion and 
delivery of the mirseographed rer>ort at a later date will be acceptable to 
and accepted by the University of Massachusetts at Fort DevenSo 

7. Unless it shall be determined that the University of Massachusetts 
at Fort Dcvens prefers that the report shall be printed by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts as a state document wholly at the expense of the state, the 
ACE undertakes to print, publish, and deliver 1,000 copies of the report 
within four months, more or less, after the date of actual delivery of the 
mimeographed report as described in paragraph 6 hereof, at a charge repre- 
senting actual cost of printing, binding, and delivery, and in no event to 
exceed f. 1,000 in the aggregate. In this event it is understood that the 
ACS would print and publish such number of copies in excess of 1,000 as is 
estimated to be needed to meet the demand, tend that the report would be 
listed in the catalog of publications of the ACE and kept in stock and 
offered for sale at a specified price per copy. 

G. The experience of the ACE in survey enterprises indicates that the 
effort in this case necessary to produce a report mooting ACS standards and 
worthy of the University of Massachusetts would involve a minimum expenditure 
cf $£,000, for preparation of the report and mimeo^aphing the same as de- 
scribed in paragraph 6 hereof, and exclusive of the cost of printing; and 
binding the report as described in paragraph 7 hereof * The AC3 undertakes 
to perform the necsssary services as described in paragraphs 2 through 7 
hereof, inclusive, at actual reasonable cost, as estimated in the budget 
constituting paragraph 9 hereof, aggregating not less than $6,000 and in no 
event exceeding $7,500, payable by the University of Massachusetts at Fort 
Sevens as follows? First installment, §2,500 within ten days after the 
signing of this agreement. Second installment, $2,000, on or about I!ay 1, 
19u9. Third installment, not less than §£00 nor more than $1,500, as de- 
termined by a statement of actual costs to be furnished by ACE, at the time 
of the delivery of the mimeographed report as described in paragraph 6 hereof c 
Fourth installment, not to exceed $1,000, at the time of delivery of 1,000 
copies of the printed report as described in paragraph 7 hereof „ 



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9» It is the intent to conduct the survey as efficiently and econom- 
ically as circumstances permit, and at all events at a total cost not to 
exceed the maximum established in paragraph 3 hereof,, Accordingly a budget 
is here inserted showing estimated costs in two columns, one minimum and 
one maximum *. The necessity of overcoming uncertainties relating tc""bbtaining 
the services of liighly-qualified experts for short periods of time on short 
notice, and to the amounts which may be necessary to transport them from 
their usual places of regular employment to Fort Devens and return, will 
require adninistrative skill and ingenuity to be exercised during periods of 
time not susceptible of rigidly exact estimation in advance; and it is under- 
stood that all items in the budget as here shown are intended to be flexible, 
but tliat in no event is the grand total to exceed $7*500<> 



Item IJinimum Maximum 

■ ■■■■— - mm ■« » ■ ■ ■■ iu i w — jo i ■■ i win aw»www 

Compensation of survey director, approximately 

half-tine for equivalent of three months (duties 

chiefly administrative * f partly editorial), ♦ « , . , $1,000 . $1,500 

Compensation of three selected educational experts 

T/ho will each spend an average of 2 weeks 1 time on 

the survey, of which time approximately half will 

be spent at Fort Devens •«o*«o«««»««»« 1,500 2,000 

Stenographic and clerical assistance for each of 
tho foregoing, in the aggregate •«•••••••• 

editorial services (below level of director; above 
level of clerical assistance) . 



«••«*• 



Transportation snd related expenses of director and 
three educational experts from their regular places 
of employment to Fort Eevens and return «....♦ 



.? * » o « • » O « 



Telephone, telegraph, postage • o 
Office rental and equipment (pro rata). . , • • , , 
Supplies, stationery, mimeographing expense « . • • 
Fee for accounting and fiscal administration • • „ 
Contingent fund • •»•••*••••••••••« 

TOTAL (exclusive. of printing and binding) « . • 

Printing, binding, delivery of 1,000 copies 

of report (paper bound) •••••••«•» 

GRAIIS TOTAL (including printing and binding). . ♦ $5,?00 $7,500 

It is contemplated as a reasonable expectation that the actual total 
expenditure will be at least ten per cent less than tho maximum specified* 



550 


700 


Uoo 


600 


5oo 


700 


150 


200 


100 


125 


200 


250 


175 


200 


&>5 


225 


S.5,000 


£6,500 


900 


1,000 



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10* 3olieving that the projected survey is in the public interest 
and likely to be productive of valuable results Tor the people of the 
Comonv/ealth of Ilassachusetts and for the general advancement oi' the cause 
of higher education in the United States, the undersigned, duly authorized 
to sign contracts for the University of Massachusetts at Fort Bevens and 
for the Anerican Council on Education respectively, have subscribed their 
signatures hereto for the purpose of and with intent to put this cwinorandum 
of agreement into in^ediate force and effect 



SIOUSDj 

For^ne'tlniversrty' oi* llassachusoTt s" 
at Fort Devena 

Place and date of foregoing signatures 



,192*9. 



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SIGiaSD: 

For the American Council on Education 

Place and date of foregoing signature: 



, 19li?. 



Countersignatures, if and as required "oy the Coimorr^alth of nassachusetts: 



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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE AT FT. DEVENS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES, UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AT FORT DEVENS 

May 18, 1949, 2:00 P.M., Mr. Bartlett' s Office, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Carmichael, Desmond, 
Keleher, Cluverius, President Van Meter, 
Vice President Williams, Dean Stokes, 
Secretary Burke 

The following representatives of the American Council on 
Education attended the meeting to discuss vith the Executive 
Committee the survey which they are doing of the Fort Devens program: 
Dean C. E. Partch of Kutgers University, Dr. Arthur J. Klein, 
Dr. M. M. Chambers and Dr. Algo Henderson. 

They asked the following questions: 

1. Why was the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts augmented with presidents of Massachu- 
setts colleges for the purpose of operating Devens? 

2. What part did the University at Amherst play in 
connection with the development of Devens? 

3. How has the University at Amherst benefited from the 
Devens program? 

4. Why were not more staff members transferred from 
Devens to Amherst? 

5. What did the University propose to do with student 
record cards of Devens students when Devens is closed? 

6. Why was Devens closed? 

7. Will students transferring from Devens have to pay 
higher costs for education at the University or 
college to which they transfer? 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 P.M. 

_ Secretary 



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